Curriculum Overview 2020/21

Our goal is that our students live life in all its fullness and flourish as God intended. We want to give every girl a better future.

 

Intent

The morality of our values- Trust, Hope, Endurance, Forgiveness, Friendship and Thankfulness are at the heart of the Davison family ethos.

Academically, students thrive in a calm and purposeful environment. Students’ life chances improve as their Numeracy and Literacy improve and their progress in this area is a key focus. Well-resourced and highly qualified staff deliver programs of study based on high expectations and the belief that students’ can go beyond their best in all areas of the curriculum.

Our assessment system is based on the growth mindset theory and involves the use of key performance indicators and personal learning check lists. Our students become independent learners as their assessment develops in partnership with their teachers. 

Parents and carers are instrumental to student progress and we endeavour to involve them as partners in their daughters’ learning journey.

We believe that the timetabled lessons are only a part of the curriculum at  Davison and we encourage all members of the Davison family to fully immerse themselves in the life of the school. As well a our “Colour Family System” there are numerous opportunities for personal development outside the classroom. Our reward systems and Davison Pledge also reflect this.

The many life changing extracurricular opportunities at Davison help students to:

  • exceed their academic expectations
  • become confident, successful and responsible young women
  • understand Christian values whatever their beliefs and faith
Implementation

The experiences on offer both within and outside the timetable are designed to give students a broad and balanced experience. The curriculum is reviewed each year and adjusted to ensure that:

  • our resources are used effectively
  • subjects have the correct time allocation and content
  • the subjects on offer are in line with our intent
  • we comply with the national curriculum
  • it is relevant to our new students and our students as they progress to post 16.

We regularly review and monitor the curriculum content through lesson observations, subject line management and data analysis of  student progress,attendance and behaviour. Our continuing professional development sees teachers as reflective practitioners, ensuring that we read and utilise the most recent educational research.

We ensure that able students are challenged, those with additional needs are supported and all have the opportunity for enrichment.

Our learning Platform FROG is used for communication with students and parents/carers through all year groups and Frog progress uses a Key Performance Indicator(KPI) system for year 7,8 and 9. This enables all to understand what has been learned and how to develop further using the FROG learning locker.

KPIs are assessed regularly in an appropriate way for each subject.

In years 10 and 11 learning checklist and regular assessments and feedback enables students progress. This is done in a way appropriate to the particular subjects.

Students have formal exams annually to help prepare them for their final assessments in their qualifications.

Impact

Our aim of giving every girl a better future is realised in our academic results and evident in the wonderful young women who leave us at to go onto further education, training and emploment.

Our system of Key Performance Indicators using the FROG platform is in its fifth year of development. This was our “Growth Mindset” take on life after levels and we now believe is having  a significant impact upon our students academic outcomes. At key stage 3 this has helped our students become much more independent learners so that they are able to start their qualification courses as with the tools they need to succeed.

Our progress 8 scores have been consistently at least above average in national comparisons. In 2019 we broke all of our school records for all of  headline measures for progress, attainment and attendance.

We are confident that our first full cohort to experience five years at Davison completing their qualifications in 2020 will continue this success.

See the link below for our summary of GCSE results from 2019.

As well as our headline measures an English Language standard pass (grade 4+) rate of 91% and a Maths GCSE 7+ pass rate of 30%(twice the National average) were particular highlights.

Most pleasing was that students of all abilities made similar and excellent progress overall.

Art & Design
Intent

In Creative Arts, pupils explore visual, tactile and other sensory experiences to communicate ideas and meanings. They work with traditional and new media, developing confidence, competence, imagination and creativity. They learn to appreciate and value images and artefacts across times and cultures, and to understand the contexts in which they were made. In Creative Arts, pupils reflect critically on their own and other people’s work, judging quality, value and meaning. They learn to think and act as artists, craftspeople and designers, working creatively and intelligently. They develop an appreciation of art, craft and design, and its role in the creative and cultural industries that enrich their lives.

Content

ART & DESIGN         INTENT        YEAR 7

FOCUSAUTUMN TERM – STILL LIFE
Developing an appreciation and understanding of our artistic cultural heritage.Using teachers questions find out about the genre STILL LIFE.

Find out the definitions of still life vocab.

Vanitas – understand how objects are used symbolically

Building confidence to creatively explore, experiment and invent.Using a pencil to create a wide range of tones. Blending oil pastels.
Develop knowledge and skills to record our environment and internal worlds.Understand how to use tone to give the illusion of 3D form in manufactured and geometric shapes. How to create transparency and reflections from observation.

Understanding of spatial relationships. Organising objects spatially in a drawing to convey perspective.

Critical thinkingwww. Ebi comments. Refining work using teacher feedback. Describing, analysing, interpreting and making judgements about a still life painting.
SPRING TERM    – IDENTITY
Developing an appreciation and understanding of our artistic cultural heritage.Research into a self portrait artist from a list provided by the teacher.
Building confidence to creatively explore, experiment and invent.Techniques how to use and combine Water soluble colour pencils, painting, monoprinting, collage. Creating an identity box based on chosen artist
Develop knowledge and skills to record our environment and internal worlds.Drawing from direct observation of objects that link to self identity.

Drawing tonally from a photograph.

Critical thinkingwww, ebi comments

Description, analysis, interpretation and judgement based on a portrait painting

SUMMER TERM – ARCHITECTURE
Developing an appreciation and understanding of our artistic cultural heritage.Understanding and recognising different architectural styles. Romanesque and Gothic. Independent research into own house and a style of architecture chosen from teacher list. Study of John Piper using teacher guidelines.
Building confidence to creatively explore, experiment and invent.Exploring techniques using ink wash, pen and ink,  wet into wet, blotting and textural effects, wax resist and rubbings, collage
Develop knowledge and skills to record our environment and internal worlds.Drawing from direct observation of own house façade.

Drawing from secondary sources –ecclesiastical buildings.

Pattern and motif in building facades

Critical thinkingwww and ebi comments

description, analysis, interpretation and judgement of a building or image of a building

 

ART & DESIGN         INTENT        YEAR 8

FOCUSAUTUMN TERM  – NATURE
Developing an appreciation and understanding of our artistic cultural heritage.Research into Angie Lewin and the Romantic art movement using teacher questions. Presenting work in full flowing sentences. Selecting an Angie lewin image( or part of) to enlarge and create a transcription
Building confidence to creatively explore, experiment and invent.Exploring the atmospheric effects of monoprinting with cut paper stencils to translate Angie Lewin style into their own work. Explore collage in the same way. Compare and contrast both methods. Using Ink with watercolour techniques to create a Romantic landscape.
Develop knowledge and skills to record our environment and internal worlds.Drawing from direct observation of plant material using pencil and ink.

Drawing from secondary sources selecting and enlarging. Simplifying and accuracy with proportions.

Critical thinkingwww and ebi comments. Reviewing and refining work.

description, analysis, interpretation and judgement of a Romantic landscape – the wanderer – Caspar david friedrich

SPRING TERM – SURREALISM
Developing an appreciation and understanding of our artistic cultural heritage.Using different sources to create a double page about SURREALISM

Using teacher guide lines for content which includes how surrealism has impacted on modern day culture.

Building confidence to creatively explore, experiment and invent.Exploring Surrealism through both digital and manual cut and paste collage
Develop knowledge and skills to record our environment and internal worlds.Surreal Photography using juxtaposition and change of scale. Drawing from direct observation to invent surreal objects
Critical thinkingwww and ebi comments. Review and modify own work.

Describing, analysing, interpreting and making judgements about a surreal painting or sculpture. Dali Metamorphosis of narcissus.

SUMMER TERM – MARK HERALD
Developing an appreciation and understanding of our artistic cultural heritage.Research into Mark Herald and other illustrators using internet, video and books. Working and business practises of an artist.
Building confidence to creatively explore, experiment and invent.Ink and cross-hatching. Stylising into black and white. Polyprinting, rubbings and press printing. Collage
Develop knowledge and skills to record our environment and internal worlds.Photos of animals in natural environments, Photos of collections of objects.

Drawings from secondary sources – animals

Drawing from direct observation of insects-

Changing scale.

Critical thinkingwww and ebi comments. Independently reviewing and refining work.

Describing, analysing, interpreting and making judgements about two different chosen pieces of art with animals. Comparison of both – similarities and differences.

 

 

ART & DESIGN         INTENT        YEAR 9

FOCUSAUTUMN TERM             COAST
Developing an appreciation and understanding of our artistic cultural heritage.Researching Amiria Gale using teacher questions from more than one source. Presented in full flowing sentences. Introduction to Maggie Hambling and Hokusai waves. Compare and contrast.
Building confidence to creatively explore, experiment and invent.Using a variety of different materials to record shell forms- undersding different qualities and limitations. Painting using a limited colour scheme and drawing movement with a brush. Exploring textile media by encapsulating in Plastic.
Develop knowledge and skills to record our environment and internal worlds.Capturing shape, tone , pattern and texture from observation of shells using mixed media.
Critical thinkingwww and ebi comments. Independent review and modifications.

Description, analysis, interpretation and judgement of a beach painting or sculpture. Alfred Wallis Porthmear beach.

SPRING TERM      CONFLICT AND CONTEXT
Developing an appreciation and understanding of our artistic cultural heritage.Research into a range of 20th and 21st century artists who have depicted war

and have made conceptual art. Independent research and presentation.

Making transcriptions of their work

Building confidence to creatively explore, experiment and invent.Focus on techniques used by artists studied.Exploring collage textured papers and drawings.

Exploring colour through Mark Rothko – saturated and layered colours. Spatial effects of colour. Colour theory. Stencilling

Develop knowledge and skills to record our environment and internal worlds.Drawing from observation of expressive portraits and objects related to conflict.

Drawings from own reference photographic images of war.

Critical thinkingwww and ebi comments. Independent review and modify. Description, analysis, interpretation and judgement of Picasso’s Guernica and own selection of a piece of relevant art work
SUMMER TERM         MESSAGES
Developing an appreciation and understanding of our artistic cultural heritage.Every picture tells a story.

Barbara Kruger, Teesha Moore.

Building confidence to creatively explore, experiment and invent.Digital and paper based collage.  Researching artist’s techniques. Communicating an modern day issue

.

 

Develop knowledge and skills to record our environment and internal worlds.Drawing from the imagination and memory. Unconscious drawing- doodling.
Critical thinking

 

 

ART & DESIGN                INTENT                    GCSE  COURSE

FOCUSAUTUMN TERM  &  SPRING TERM  unit 1 for portfolio  YEAR 10
Assesment objective 1

Develop ideas, through investigations, demonstrating critical understanding of sources.

Researching a number of artists tht relate to theme given by the teacher. Collecting images, finding out facts, annotating and analysing at least one example of their art work. Interpreting at least 2 artists’ styles into a number of personal outcomes. Teacher led with lots of modelling and selected artists.
Assessment objective 2

Refine work by exploring ideas, selecting and experimenting with appropriate media, materials, techniques and processes.

Exploring ceramics – texture tiles, building forms using pinching, slabs, press moulds and modelling. Recording process with notes and photographs.

Developing ideas for own ceramic outcome. Teacher led demonstrations.

Assessment objective 3

Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.

 

Drawing from direct observation using a variety of different materials and working in different scales. Making a collection of own photographs that can be used as reference.

Annotating work . Teacher guided.

Assesment objective 4

Present a personal meaningful response that realises intentions and demonstrates understanding of visual language.

Producing either a sketchbook or mounted sheets to show the story from initial research, exploring materials, developing and refining ideas to final piece. All annotated with  notes on personal journey. Modelled through teacher and past student examples.
SUMMER 7 AUTUMN TERM (YEAR 11) unit 2 with mock exam evidence for portfolio
Assesment objective 1

Develop ideas, through investigations, demonstrating critical understanding of sources.

New theme students select their own artists use the model from unit 1 to research, analyse and interpret artist work – at least two.
Assessment objective 2

Refine work by exploring ideas, selecting and experimenting with appropriate media, materials, techniques and processes.

Teacher workshops demonstrating a range of two dimensional techniques and use of different materials. Pupils developing skills in each area and encouraged to experiment. Pupils select some areas to develop ideas for their final piece encouraged to use mixed media and to record.
Assessment objective 3

Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.

 

Drawing and painting workshops encouraging students to work in unfamiliar ways and to develop confidence. Pupils select techniques to develop further what ever is appropriate to develop ideas for their final piece.
Assesment objective 4

Present a personal meaningful response that realises intentions and demonstrates understanding of visual language.

Pupils begin by  teacher led activities from which they can draw upon to work more independently( 10 weeks) At the end of the summer term pupils are given a starting point using the same theme in the format of an exam controlled test starting point.  Autumn term year 11 work through as a mock exam using all the assessment objectives. This can be presented on boards or in a sketchbook which can include work from end of year 11. The final piece to be done under exam conditions from Autumn half term till Christmas.

 

 

ART & DESIGN                INTENT      GCSE COURSE

FOCUSSPRING TERM   ( YEAR 11)   CONTROLLED TEST papers given out first lesson of term
Assesment objective 1

Develop ideas, through investigations, demonstrating critical understanding of sources.

Pupils need to select a starting point from the paper. They need to select and investigate suitable artists in the way shown in previous work showing the impact this has had on their own ideas.
Assessment objective 2

Refine work by exploring ideas, selecting and experimenting with appropriate media, materials, techniques and processes.

Pupils should select the most appropriate materials and techniques to develop their ideas. They need to show experimentation, review and refinement. Everything should link together to demonstrate how they are developing a personal response.
Assessment objective 3

Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.

 

Recording should be of a competent standard using a variety of techniques they have learnt previously. All should show a clear development towards their final outcome.
Assesment objective 4

Present a personal meaningful response that realises intentions and demonstrates understanding of visual language.

Final piece is executed in 10 hours under exam conditions at end of march – two complete days. Preliminary work can be presented in sketchbook or on mounted sheets and must tell the story of the creative journey with annotations throughout.
SUMMER 7 AUTUMN TERM (YEAR 11)  these lessons will be until the formal exams start
Assesment objective 1

Develop ideas, through investigations, demonstrating critical understanding of sources.

Review and refine portfolio of work
Assessment objective 2

Refine work by exploring ideas, selecting and experimenting with appropriate media, materials, techniques and processes.

Review and refine portfolio of work
Assessment objective 3

Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.

 

Review and refine portfolio of work
Assesment objective 4

Present a personal meaningful response that realises intentions and demonstrates understanding of visual language.

Review and refine portfolio of work
Implementation

Organisation

Key stage 3 and 4 pupils are taught in mixed ability classes. At key stage 3 the students have 2X I hour lessons, most of them are taught as doubles within a fortnight. All lessons are taught by subject specialists. Some SEND students are taken out of lessons for literacy and numeracy intervention and some for peripatetic music lessons. At Key stage 4 students have five hours a fortnight which is split into 2 double I hour lessons and one single.

A Creative Arts technician is shared amongst the team to help prepare, organise and monitor materials and resources. They also help with displays of work both inside and outside the classroom. On occasions the technician also works alongside pupils who need assistance with organising resources.

All the departments’ schemes of work which includes resources and homework are shared on course materials and also on FROG. These materials are reviewed at departmental meetings which happen once a fortnight and are up dated regularly. New resources are shared amongst the department. Responsibility for developing the department site on FROG has been shared amongst the Creative Arts team.

The programme of study uses a variety of different teaching strategies to develop critical thinking, creativity, practical skills and cultural understanding. Personal qualities such as organisation skills, empathy, resilience, and personal expression are fostered as pupils work through the projects.

Feedback and feedforward

At key stage 3 all our Key performance Indicators reflects the creative process and are interrelated. There is a focus on reporting on two per term. Pupils are then given the opportunity to improve these during lessons and homework tasks. At key stage 4 pupils performance indicators are these set by the exam board in the form of assessment objectives. As students work through projects they are made aware of how they are showing evidence of each.

At both Key stages verbal praise and feedback is given constantly throughout the lesson, sometimes as a group critique and also as part of a teacher walk. These methods for a practical subject are the most effective as pupil will respond immediately to improve their work. Pupils are also encouraged to become more independent in reviewing their own work and that of their peers. To assist them with this, success criteria are shared with the groups. This is useful if given part way through a piece of work therefore allowing the pupils time to respond. Marking in sketchbooks is encouraging and sets a challenge using, what went well and even better if comments. For a further challenge pupils may be set a question to answer or a more challenging related task. Pupils who respond to this will be credited in their ATLs. At key stage 3 a FROG KPI log is kept at the front of their sketchbooks with blue, green and amber status given to the tasks set for each project. At Key stage 4  a grid showing GCSE criteria is used to inform students of their progress.

Developing Independence.

Students in Key stage 3 are expected to complete a 30-45 minute task for homework each fortnight. This is set using FROG and will consist of a task relating to their class work. This sometimes is flipped learning and requires them to produce something that they will use in their next lesson. The homework will have an indication of what the teacher is looking for and then an extension task for those students who like a challenge. ATLs for students will reflect any pupils who have attempted the extension tasks. At key stage 4 the expectation is that students will spend at least 90 mins a week on the homework tasks. At this stage homework is more personalise as it will relate

Impact

MPACT

Progress of key stage 3 students is monitored through FROG. There are 6 linked Key Performance indicators for each year group which reflects the creative process and shows a progression of skills that directly relate to the assessment objectives at Key stage 4. Two KP strands across all year groups are assessed each term. This assessment is standardised during department meetings to ensure consistency of judgement. Further opportunities to show achievement in these areas are given through homework and class BOOST tasks. Nearly all students achieve their KPI’s by the end of the year and many exceed them. Those students who do not achieve are monitored and are supported to develop their confidence.

Key stage 4 students are assessed against AQA assessment objectives. In their class and homework tasks they are given interim feedback and the opportunity to respond and make modifications before final marking takes place. Year 11 are given a mock exam in the autumn term where they can learn strategies to evidence each of the assessment objectives so that in the Summer term they are more confident to tackle their final controlled test. AQA standardisation courses are attended by representatives of the  Creative  arts staff. Department moderation of both portfolio work and controlled test takes place within the department before marks are sent to the exam board. Throughout the GCSE course the Horsforth Quadrant is used to identify students who are in danger of not achieving their Most Likely Grade. BOOST sessions at lunchtime and after school are offered to these pupils.

Exam results are consistently above the national average.

2019

4+  95.12%

7+ 46.34%

P8  0.94

The following DATA has been collected about Creative paths after Davison although at present the tracking data is limited. Last year the following numbers of students opted for post 16 art based courses:-

Photography 4, Art 7, Textiles 2, Graphic Design 4, Media/Digital Media 5, Games Development 2

We also have evidence that Higher education courses in these areas were chosen by previous students.

Art Foundation 1, Photography (Fashion, Advertising, Editorial) 2

 

In conversation with lots of past students although they do not continue to study art they continue to produce art work finding and enjoy visiting exhibitions and seeking cultural experiences. Many apply their creative mindset to contribute to their workplace.

Child Development
Intent

This subject intends to provide the academic knowledge and understanding for any student who may progress to a career working with young children as well as providing personal knowledge and understanding for all students who may go on to be parents or carers themselves in the future.

In Child Development students will gain knowledge and understanding of how a child develops from conception to the age of five years. This subject builds on knowledge gained at KS3 in science and personal development about relationships and how a baby is conceived and born, by going into greater depth about how the child is cared for up until the age of five.

Students will start in year 10 by learning about the health and well-being of the child. This knowledge will then be used in their coursework by allowing them to show their understanding of the equipment and nutritional needs of different aged children in a nursery setting.

Students will then learn about how a child develops physically, socially and intellectually and how different types of play can aid this development. They will then use this knowledge for the second piece of coursework which is to plan two play activities to carry out with a child in a nursery setting.

Content

Year 10- R018 health and well-being of a child

Term1

  • Reproduction and the roles and responsibilities of parents
  • Antenatal care and preparation for birth
  • Postnatal checks, postnatal provision and conditions for development

Term 2

  • How to recognise, manage and prevent childhood illness
  • Child Safety
  • Coursework R019- understanding the equipment and nutritional needs of a child from birth-5 years task 1-2

Term 3

  • Coursework R019- understanding the equipment and nutritional needs of a child from birth-5 years task 3-4

Year 11

Term1

  • Coursework R020- understanding the development of a child task 1-3
  • Revision – R018- health and wellbeing of a child

Term 2

  • ALL STUDENTS SIT R018 written paper
  • Coursework R020- understanding the development of a child- task 4
  • Coursework R019 and R020 review

Term 3

  • Coursework- R019 and R020 act on feedback
  • Revision R018- health and wellbeing of a child (re-takers only)
Implementation

Child development is currently taught by three teachers, each with sole responsibility for their classes. Each class has 5 hours per fortnight and the lessons are delivered in a multipurpose computer room. The benefit of this classroom is that students sit at desks for teacher led discussions, group work and practical activities as well as computers for each student for research, coursework and independent theory. Teachers of child development meet once every half term to share planning, develop new teaching ideas, standardise marking and discuss the logistics and management of teaching resources. Teachers are also in regular contact by email for matters regarding individual students. Teachers are observed by the subject leader this is also the opportunity for students to voice their opinions of the course and where areas of development can be identified.

All aspects of the specification are taught with as much practical application as possible. We have a large store of teaching resources including model babies, examples of travelling equipment, feeding equipment, sleeping equipment and clothing and footwear for children. These resources are used for teaching to enable the students to gain hands on experience and enhance their understanding of the theory

Where possible students will make models, draw diagrams and make films to appeal to the many different learning styles of students. Students are supplied with or can provide their own A4 folder for notes made in class. Any work completed on the computer is saved into our shared OneDrive folder where the teacher and student can both view, edit and comment on the work.

Homework is set regularly to consolidate new information learned in class. Once coursework lessons commence at the end of year 10 and continue into year 11 – homework will entirely focus on completing coursework tasks.

All year 10 Child Development students are given the opportunity to volunteer at the Davison Day Nursery. This opportunity gives them experience of working in a nursery and being around young children. It benefits them in their coursework by being able to see for themselves nursery equipment being used; meals being produced, and young children’s development being observed and recorded by the Nursery staff.

All students have access to the course textbook for use in lessons and are encouraged to purchase the course revision guide for use in lessons and at home. All powerpoints used by teachers in lessons are available to the students on the FROG department site.

There are high expectations of behaviour in child development lessons, where we aim to create a calm atmosphere of trust and openness, where student and teacher both feel comfortable with discussions of their own experiences. This discussion adds to the learning of students as well as enhancing student-teacher relationships. Students are encouraged to write a letter to their teacher at the start of year 10 to tell them anything they feel the teacher should know about them. This gives the teacher the knowledge to approach certain topics with sensitivity, for example Sudden Infant Death Syndrome or childhood illness. There are also high expectations for achievement with a target to improve the number of students gaining D2 or D2*. Students capable of achieving these highest grades are identified by teacher assessment and by using the department spreadsheets where data is analysed to estimate current grades. Students who are identified to be close to a higher grade boundary are encouraged to re-take their exam in summer of year 11 in order to gain more marks, they will be specifically targeted in term 2 year 11 to work on areas of their coursework where they can improve. Every Friday after school there is a child development booster club which is adapted for the students who attend, to either focus on coursework or exam content. All students are invited to attend and those aiming for the highest grades encouraged.

Teachers are in regular contact with parents via email, phone or school comms. Particularly where students need extra support with meeting deadlines. Parents are directed to the department site on FROG which holds details of all coursework tasks to be completed and materials to help them.

A wide range of students choose child development as an option at key stage 4 and any student can choose it. Lessons are differentiated to provide extra resources, including exemplar materials, for students of lower ability and students are extended by the regular discussion opportunities within lesson time. Pupil Premium students are provided with a revision guide.

Impact

The exam content (R018) focuses on five learning objectives, students will complete an assessment at the end of each. The assessment ranges from 25-45 marks depending on the length of the learning objective and consists of past exam paper questions. The purpose of this assessment is for the students to practice exam style questions and for the teacher to assess students’ knowledge and understanding of the topic. The results of these end of topic tests are recorded on the department spreadsheets.

Students will work on coursework in lessons and at home and will be set clear deadlines for handing in each task, these deadlines will be made clear in lessons and sent on FROG. Each task will be assessed, and feedback given via OneDrive. Estimated marks for their work will be recored on department spreadsheets.

Students will complete the externally marked written exam paper R018 in January of Year 11, the results are published in March with the option to re-take in June. Coursework R019 and 20 will be submitted to the teacher by Easter of Year 11 for final marking and moderation.

 

Citizenship Studies
Intent

GCSE Citizenship Studies builds upon the knowledge and understanding gained from NC KS3 statutory Citizenship. At Davison, this is possibly a total of 15 hours curriculum time, given the constraints of timetabling at KS3. However, GCSE Citizenship Studies, provides a triad of opportunities for each student:

  • the study of a rigorous and challenging GCSE course
  • the development of their cultural capital and political literacy, which gives them the confidence to make informed decisions and to participate fully in British society throughout their life
  • the acquisition of important key skills such as communication, decision-making and independence for example, by writing formal letters, speaking to an audience, planning a display stall

The content within Citizenship Studies is founded upon the fundamental British values of democracy, rule of law, individual liberty, respect for and tolerance of people of other faiths or no faith, which supports SMSC criteria.

Content

Year 10

Autumn term
Introduction – Life in the UK booklet which aims to provide a simple overview of the institutions within the UK and so provide a foundation for the course and to establish baseline cultural knowledge

Life in Modern Britain – Identity

  • Principles and values in the UK and the laws which support them
  • Make-up of the UK
  • Population trends within the UK
  • Causes and impacts of migration into the UK
  • Identity and multiple identities

Life in Modern Britain – The Media and the Free Press

  • What is media?
  • Trends within media
  • The rights, roles and responsibilities of the newspaper press
  • How the newspaper press holds people in power to account
  • Press newspaper regulation and censorship

Life in Modern Britain – The UK’s role in key international organisations

  • The role of the UK in the European Union, the United Nations, The Commonwealth, North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, The Council of Europe and the World Trade Organisation
  • How the UK is involved in resolving international disputes and conflict
  • How the UK responds to humanitarian crises

Spring term

Life in Modern Britain – Making a difference within society

  • The ways in which citizens can take part in the democratic process

Rights and Responsibilities – Laws in contemporary UK and rights and responsibilities within the legal system

  • The fundamental principles of law
  • The role and powers of the police
  • The role and powers of the judiciary and legal representatives
  • The difference between civil and criminal law and law courts
  • The rights and legal entitlements at differing ages

Rights and Responsibilities – How laws protect the citizen and deal with criminals

  • How citizen’s rights have changed and developed over time – Magna Carta to present
  • The right to representation – trade unions and employers associations

Summer term

Rights and Responsibilities – How laws protect the citizen and deal with criminals continued

  • The nature of criminality in the UK and the factors which affect crime
  • How the UK deals with those who commit crime – custodial, non-custodial sentences and the youth justice system

Rights and Responsibilities – Human rights

  • The importance of key international agreements and treaties – Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Convention on Human Rights, United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, The UK Human Rights Act, 1998
  • The role of international law in conflict situations

Rights and Responsibilities – Bringing about change in the legal system

  • The role of the citizen within the legal system – jury service, tribunals, magistrates, police and crime commissioners, neighbourhood watch, witnesses and victims
  • The role of groups and organisations – eg Guildford Four, Hillsborough disaster

Politics and Participation – Political power in the UK

  • The values underpinning democracy
  • The British Constitution
  • Separation of powers – the executive, the legislature and the judiciary

Year 11

Autumn term
Taking Citizenship Action – Investigation

  • Secondary research, primary research, action planning, carrying out active citizenship
    Politics and Participation – Local and Devolved Government
  • The role and structure of local government
  • The nature and organisation of regional and devolved governments
  • Elections – who can stand for election and who can vote, issues relating to voting
  • Public services and Government revenue and expenditure

Spring term

Politics and Participation – Where does political power reside

  • First past the post and other voting systems
  • Major political parties in the UK
  • How parliament works
  • The role of government, the cabinet and the civil service

Politics and Participation – How other countries govern themselves

  • Democratic and non-democratic political systems

Politics and Participation – How citizens can bring about political change

  • How organisations and citizens have campaigned for political change

Summer term

Revision
Each of the 4 themes are revised via formal teaching and 4 x 50 minute silent examination question practice in the final five weeks before the GCSE examinations. A schedule is created and published on the FROG department site in order to support the students in the revision. The question papers are marked and returned to the students, with detailed feedback and feedforward comments. Students are challenged to improve upon the scores they achieved for each theme in the mock exams.

Implementation

GCSE Citizenship Studies is taught by two members of staff whose skills, confidence and expertise in the subject has developed over the past six years.

Throughout KS4, Citizenship Studies is allocated 5 hours curriculum time per fortnight, taught in five one hour lessons. Citizenship Studies is a popular subject but is limited to two large mixed-ability and culturally diverse teaching groups.

The subject is taught in a dedicated classroom and it is well resourced with AQA GCSE Citizenship Studies textbooks, AQA GCSE Citizenship Studies revision guides, mini ipads and a near complete department resource site on FROG.

Critical Thinking

The GCSE Citizenship Studies course provides an excellent platform for students to develop their cultural capital.

During the first few weeks of their KS4 experience, students complete a booklet entitled ‘Living in the UK’ in which they research information about the institutions and at the heart of the UK. This provides them with the key vocabulary and concepts they need to ‘pull together and join up’ their understanding in order to respond to the challenging AO3 (analysis, evaluation, examination and justification) synoptic examination questions.

Students are encouraged to consider critically issues which currently exist within the UK, for example, how the UK Government balances its public service funding yet is still able to provide the necessary level of care and provision. Students need to critically analyse their secondary research to check its relevance, currency, validity and accuracy. The investigation also requires students to reduce their researched facts, to think creatively and to devise resources which aim to engage and inform their intended audience.

Throughout the two year course, students are taught to respond to questions by considering a wide range of views and therefore develop the skill of giving an evenly balanced answer.

Explanation and Modelling
When explaining key concepts, the Citizenship Studies teachers are fortunate to be able to draw upon current news stories to make the teaching as relevant as possible. These can change on a daily basis, which makes the subject exciting and engaging.

Youtube clips and video news stories are used widely in the classroom to support explanation and students conduct surveys to collect opinions to support their learning.

From the outset, students are given frequent opportunities to develop and improve their technique for written examination answers. Command words and questions are discussed as a whole class activity and writing frames are provided; this is support gradually removed as the course progresses. Exemplar answers are gradually being uploaded onto the FROG pages for Citizenship Studies.

Mastery Skills
Success in Citizenship Studies lies not just in knowledge of the content, but also the mastery of the assessment objectives.

Students become familiar with the expectations of each of the three assessment objectives AO1, AO2 and AO3. They are given regular and frequent opportunities to respond to these different types of questions, either for a homework task, formative assessment or summative assessment.

Students are encouraged to re-write answers in order to make improvements.

Students are directed to a comprehensively full Citizenship Studies site on FROG, which has links to video clips and additional notes and a store of past question papers and exemplar answers.

Feedback and Feedforward
Verbal praise is used widely in our teaching, during question and answer sessions, discussions and when teachers speak to students in a one-to-one situation as they circulate the classroom.

Teachers give detailed comments when marking assessments which identify what went well and also suggest what improvements could be made.

Assessment feedback sheets are used after Year 10 and Year 11 mock exams; students refer to the mark schemes and identify targets for improvement.

Challenge
Challenge is provided through discussions in the classroom. Students are challenged to make the link between the key concepts being learned in lessons and on-going current news stories.

The synoptic AO3 questions demand a higher level understanding and the ability to pull together their knowledge.

Independence and self-regulated learners
Students are directed to use the FROG Citizenship Studies pages in order to further their knowledge and understanding. Likewise students are also encouraged to widen their knowledge and deepen their understanding by reading a newspaper, following news apps, watching relevant documentaries on television.

Practice questions are made available in the classroom for students to self-select, which teachers will mark.

During the Active Citizenship investigation, students are required to work independently and to use their initiative and resourcefulness to conduct meaningful research tasks and devise engaging display boards.

Impact

Uptake at GCSE is high; the subject is often oversubscribed. Students enjoy learning about the way in which the UK functions and about the ways in which they can actively participate in society now and in the future. Students often feel challenged by the theme about politics, but quickly become engaged with and excited by the potential opportunities their increasing political literacy affords them. Many students follow related courses such as A levels in Politics, Law, Applied Law, Economics and Sociology as well as BTEC Criminology and BTEC Public Services at their post 16 destinations.

In 2019, the figures are as follows:

  • 16 Law
  • 5 Economics
  • 2 Politics
  • 16 Sociology
  • 22 Criminology
  • 3 Public Service

Students written work is assessed regularly – both informally or formally. The level of challenge increases as the students’ progress through the two year course.

Informal formative assessment, set by individual teacher, may take the form of summary comments at the end of a unit of work or a scaffolded essay questions set for homework. This work will either be peer-marked or marked and commented upon by the teacher.

Formal summative assessments are set half termly including Year 10 and Year 11 mock exams. Initially they are small parts of question papers but as time passes the level of difficulty is increased and whole sections of examination papers, including the challenging AO3 style questions are set. Both the teachers record marks and these are discussed regularly as an agenda item at the fortnightly department meetings. The teachers share the mock exam marking in order to moderate; this also ensures a good platform for discussion about student progress. Four years on from the introduction of the new specification, the department has an increasing number of past papers for the AQA GCSE Citizenship Studies course (8100) and so it is becoming easier to decide upon and structure a more relevant assessment structure, where the questions we set are more reflective of the demands of the examinations the students will face at the end of the two year course.

Student progress is monitored closely; using progress, as well as considering attendance and ATL data, students are placed into one of four categories on the Horsforth Quadrant. Students who fall into high effort and low progress are invited to attend a weekly booster session; this aims to work on and improve the skills and techniques required for success in their examination. To date, students who have regularly attended the booster sessions have shown pleasing progress in the mock exams.

Students are successful at GCSE Citizenship Studies. The results for the most recent cohort, 2019 are as follows:

% grade 7 and above – 44%
% grade 5 and above – 84%
% grade 4 and above 88%

LOP – 3.91

P8 – 1.36

For each of the 57 students, GCSE Citizenship Studies was either their best result, or equalled another best result

Computing and ICT
Intent

Our intent is to promote computational thinking and digital creativity to give our pupils the life-skills that will enable them to embrace and utilise new technology in a socially responsible and safe way in order to flourish. We want our students to develop foundation capabilities to enable them to be discerning, life-long learners in a fast moving technological society. We want the students to be:

  • Confident in using code and can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including logic, algorithms and data representation
  • Confident while coding so they can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems
  • Effective communicators and who evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems
  • Able to connect with others responsibly and are competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology

Not only do we want students to be digitally literate and competent end-users of technology, but through our lessons we want them to develop creativity, resilience, problem-solving and critical thinking skills, enabling them to be responsible digital citizens of a wider global community.

Pupils should be taught to: PoS

design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems COMPUTING

understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking [for example, ones for sorting and searching]; use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem COMPUTING

use two or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems; make appropriate use of data structures [for example, lists, tables or arrays]; design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions COMPUTING

understand simple Boolean logic [for example, AND, OR and NOT] and some of its uses in circuits and programming; understand how numbers can be represented in binary, and be able to carry out simple operations on binary numbers [for example, binary addition, and conversion between binary and decimal] COMPUTING & ICT

understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems COMPUTING & ICT

understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer system; understand how data of various types (including text, sounds and pictures)
can be represented and manipulated digitally, in the form of binary digits COMPUTING & ICT

undertake creative projects that involve selecting, using, and combining multiple applications, preferably across a range of devices, to achieve challenging
goals, including collecting and analysing data and meeting the needs of known users COMPUTING & ICT

create, re-use, revise and re-purpose digital artefacts for a given audience, with attention to trustworthiness, design and usability COMPUTING & ICT

understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct and know how to report concerns. COMPUTING & ICT

Content

Year 7

Term 1

Using Davison Network – networks, folders and files/ DFP, FROG, ONENOTE, O365 etc.
KPI – You know how to operate the school’s core Computing network systems.

History of Computing
KPI – You can understanding how computers have developed through History.

Term 2

Under the Hood
KPI – You understand how a computer works including both hardware and software

Thinking like a computer scientist
KPI – You understand the main ideas behind ‘Computational Thinking’

Term 3

Drawing and manipulating shapes – Programming in Scratch
KPI – You understand the basics of text and block based programming (coding)

Creating an animation – Programming in Scratch
KPI – You effectively apply your knowledge of programming to a specific task


Year 8

Term 1

Computer Aided Design/ Manufacture
KPI – You have developed your knowledge of Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Computer Aided Manufacture (CAM), to develop a desired 3D outcome.

Understanding Computers – Operating Systems & Software.
KPI – You have an understanding of different types of software: Application Software, Utility Software and Operating System Software.

Term 2

Manipulating files and folders – CLOUD COMPUTING/ ONE DRIVE
KPI – You can use, organise and structure files and folders together in a logical manner

Binary
KPI – You have understanding of how data is stored as Binary and you know how to manipulate Binary data by adding Binary Strings

Term 3

Programming and Algorithms MICROBITS
KPI – You can use a Block Editor with a Microbit Processor to achieve a desired programming outcome

Patterns
KPI – You have an understanding of patterns leading to a workable program


Year 9

Term 1

Representing data – image manipulation. Vector drawing on publisher.
KPI – You understand how data is represented in files and how to manipulate the files to optimize quality.

Programming in Python
KPI – You can use Microsoft Block Editor with a Microbit Processor to achieve a desired programming outcome.

Website Design
KPI – You can use a variety of software to plan, design and develop a functional website

Programming in Python
KPI – You can use Python text base programming to achieve desired outcome.

Term 2

Cracking Code – Encryption
KPI – You can apply your knowledge of Binary to new situations to solve problems

Representing data – image manipulation. Vector drawing on publisher.
KPI – You understand how data is represented in files and how to manipulate the files to optimize quality.

OCR Entry Level Computing – See Entry Level Course

Term 3

OCR Entry Level Computing – See Entry Level Course


Year 10

iMedia Digital Graphics Level 2 – Pre-production skills

Term 1

  • Introduction to the Pre – Production unit and initial assessment
  • Production planning
  • Legislation
  • Evaluation
  • Creating mind maps/spider diagrams
  • Creating visualisation diagrams

Term 2

  • Introduction to unit 1 Digital Graphics
  • Introduction to Digital Graphics techniques
  • Digital Graphics Purposes and audience influence
  • Introduction to types of Digital Graphics
  • Introduction to equipment for Digital Graphics
  • Digital Graphics software – Bitmaps
  • Digital Graphics software – Vectors
  • Interim assessment – 15 hours

Term 3

Revision for Pre Production Exam


Year 11

  • Second assignment – exploration tasks
  • How to review
  • How to plan
  • Final assignment – planning tasks

OCR GCSE COMPUTER SCIENCE


Year 10

Term 1

  • Systems Architecture
  • Memory
  • Algorithms
  • Python Basics
  • Wired & Wireless Networks
  • Networks
  • Further Python
  • NEA

Term 2

  • Storage
  • Algorithms – Sorting & Searching
  • Python Basics
  • Networks
  • System Security
  • Data Representation (Sound)
  • NEA
  • Programming Techniques
  • Producing Robust Programs
  • Computational Logic

Year 11

Term 1

  • Systems Software
  • Ethical, Legal & Cultural Issues
  • Revisit whole curriculum again focussing on knowledge gaps
  • Exam Technique
  • Past Questions

Term 2

  • Translators & Facilities of Languages
  • Data Representation
  • Revisit whole curriculum again focussing on knowledge gaps

 

 

 

 

Implementation

Computing at Davison High School offers opportunities for students to:

  • Prepare them for participation in a rapidly changing world where activities are increasingly transformed by access to ICT
  • Develop initiative and independent learning skills
  • Gain rapid access to ideas and experience from a wide range of people, communities and cultures

Year 7 Computing

Being at a new school and learning new information can be daunting for Year 7 students. Students are taught discrete Computing for one hour a week. We, at Davison High School, have created an inviting and exciting first year. The course initially involves looking at using the school network system and how to work safely and responsibly on the network.

Internet – or cyber – bullying has become a big issue with the increase of social networking among young people and our first project is designed to make students aware of the rules and etiquette involved in communicating in all aspects of Computing. Students are assessed according the assessment criteria laid out in the Assessing Students Progress criteria and will be given an assessment level at the end of each contextual unit of work.

Year 8 Computing

Year 8 builds on the assessment levels they achieve in Year 7. The class work is task-based and encourages independent learning and creativity. Davison High School has a progressive attitude towards Computing and is keen to use new and contemporary programmes as well as teach more advanced techniques in the Windows Office Suite.

Year 9 Computing

In Year 9 students are encouraged to work more independently in projects that involve web site creation, Flash animation, Java and HTML coding and writing control systems. Their work is assessed to help students achieve their ‘target’ grade at the end of Key Stage 3.
Within lessons a variety of techniques are used to deliver content or skills (using our five year plan, SOW, FROG and Course Materials). We aim to strike an effective balance between teacher input with active discovery of learning, creative and research tasks, debate/discussion and the development and practice of key skills/techniques. Computing lessons often underpin the SMSC values of Davison, particularly social and moral questions by asking the big questions related to our contextual challenges.

The KS3 curriculum offers regular opportunities for deep and critical thinking, challenging tasks and forming clear thoughts about contexts. All lessons include challenge tasks to develop thinking further and design ideas that meet a context. We ensure equality of opportunity by making lessons inclusive (this can be through a variety of ways, including use of technician support in lesson, storytelling, visual clues, questioning, explanation of key vocabulary etc.)

We have an extensive subject web pages on our VLE (FROG) which has a dedicated section for each year group containing activities, tasks, support information and resources. Learning lockers contain exemplar materials and homework is set upon this platform. This links parents into the loop of communication and also serves as a reliable way to inform about tasks and homework.

Functional Skills in Computing

The term ‘functional’ should be considered in the broad sense of providing learners with the skills and abilities they need to take an active and responsible role in their communities, in their everyday lives, workplaces and educational settings.

Students learn how to use their ICT skills to take an active and responsible role in their communities, in their everyday lives, future workplaces and educational settings. Functional ICT enables students to be able to use ICT in ways that make them effective and involved as citizens.

Functional ICT requires learners to be able to use ICT in ways that make them effective and involved as citizens, able to operate confidently in life and to work in a wide range of contexts. The ICT programme of study for key stage 4 embeds the level 2 Functional Skills standards. The key concepts reflect the ICT functional skills standards:

  • ICT capability, where learners use a range of ICT tools in a purposeful way to tackle questions, solve problems and create ideas and solutions of value in a range of contexts, and in other areas of learning, work and life
  • Communication and collaboration, where learners share and exchange information safely, effectively and responsibly
  • Exploring ideas and manipulating information, and becoming aware of the impact of technology, including issues of risk and safety surrounding the use of ICT critical evaluation of information and of the use of ICT

 

Impact

In Computing we focus on specific key KPIs for contextual projects visited in years 7, 8 and 9 with increasing challenge and new context allowing a really strong understanding of the key skills required for progress the subject. By focusing on using research and contextual themes we confidently believe pupils have the opportunity to explore the skills and knowledge necessary to progress to the two KS4 course we offer. Within each context there is a focus on Key computing and ICT skills and knowledge. This allows staff to support pupils to really challenge themselves and develop these skills.

Pupil voice in lesson observations, learning walks and via the FROG VLE is always positive and indicates high levels of pupil enjoyment and an understanding of the relevance of Computing.

Behaviour in Computing indicates that students are engaged and show real enjoyment as well as effort in this area – particularly the practical element.
The majority of student’s complete homework tasks to a good standard.

Links to FE – some of our student’s have progressed to FE Colleges. As the subject is relatively new under its new guise, it is still very early to track the development and take up of computing as a subject, to a higher level.

KPI results show high levels of attendance and success.

GCSE results – above national average – 2019 84% 9-4 with a high P8
The department continues to use the OCR exam board for both the GCSE and CAMNAT, as context content at Key Stage 3 is be a solid foundation for this KS4 course. We consistently achieve exam results above the national average in this academically rigorous subject.

Assessment at Key Stage 4 is based on exam questions, contexts, knowledge, practical skills and providing formative and summative feedback to help pupils improve. By the time pupils start NEA’s and lead onto written exams they should be confident in the content of the exam process and how to approach exam/ contextual questions and tasks.

Curriculum Support
Intent

Curriculum Support is a safe and nurturing environment which allows students to grow in confidence, not only academically, but socially and emotionally. Students develop their literacy and numeracy skills working either in small groups or on a 1:1 basis. The lessons, based on the development of social and emotional skills, are tailored to meet the needs of the individual students and could involve small group activities or a focussed 1:1 session with an LSA. Lessons also take place for students with an Education, Health and Care Plan, to deliver the targets/activities written into their plan and other students receive additional lessons if suggested by supporting outside agencies e.g. Speech & Language or the Autism & Social Communication Team. DEAR support is provided daily to help improve students reading levels and comprehension.

Content

Literacy

Year 7

Spellings
Punctuation – full stops, capital letter, question marks, exclamation marks and commas
Adjectives, Similes and Metaphors
Apostrophes – contractions & possession
Alliteration
Homophones
Creative Writing

Year 8

Spellings
Punctuation
Nouns, adjectives, verbs and adverbs
Similes, metaphors, personification
Homophones
Persuasive Writing

Year 9

Spellings
Sentences – simple, compound and complex
Sentence Starters – starting a sentence with a verb, adverb, simile and adjective
Persuasive writing
Apostrophes – possessives
Vocabulary and creative writing

Year 10 and 11

AQA Entry Level Certificate Step Up To English

Numeracy

Year 7

Place Value Whole Numbers
Place Value Decimal Numbers
Addition & Subtraction

Year 8

Solving Numerical Problems
Fractions
Fractions, Decimals & Percentages
Algebra

Year 9

Ratio & Proportion
Angles, Area & Pie Charts
Square Numbers and Cube Numbers
Mean, Median, Mode & Range

Year 10 and 11

AQA Entry Level Certificate Mathematics

CS Nurture

Year 7
Social Skills – Settling into High School
Literacy Skills – Talk for Writing
Emotional Literacy – Dragon Project
Literacy Skills – Inference
Cross Curricular Project – Literacy, Geography and Art

Year 8
Emotional literacy – Poetry
Cultural Capital – Poetry
Social and Emotional Skills – Creative Writing

Year 9
Cultural Capital – Victorians
Literacy – Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol
Poetry – Inference

Implementation

Critical Thinking and Thinking Hard

  • Encourage independent note-taking and selecting information which is then used to inform their own work.
  • Development of vital communication skills, empathy and emotional literacy skills
  • Development of confidence to share work verbally

 

Modelling and Explanation

  • Use of template material to scaffold understanding of task
  • Model examples of previous student work across a range of achievement levels
  • Peer mentors to model positive behaviour for learning

 

Structured Practice of Key Mastery Skills

  • Repetition of key literacy skills in Year 7, 8 and 9.
  • Practice assessment papers for Step-Up to English and Entry Level Maths.
  • Repetition of skills delivered in lessons.

 

Feedback / Feedforward

  • Employ a range of verbal / written feedback strategies in both literacy and numeracy lessons.
  • Students are given the opportunity to respond to the feedback, and ask questions if they are unsure.
  • Use of formative verbal feedback in lessons.

 

Challenge for Every Student

  • Students are encouraged to challenge themselves by making a direct link between what they have learnt in CS and their subject lessons.
  • Give students the opportunity to ask questions and support them to develop their answers.
  • Learning spellings, times-tables and encouraging students to read at home

 

Independence and Self-regulated learners

  • Give students opportunities for learning independently through paired and group work.
  • Key adults are available at all times to encourage students to become confident with their own abilities for learning.
  • Deliver life skills programmes in small groups or on a 1:1.
  • Targeted independent learning
Impact

Students (SOS) Profile Review Meeting with the SENDCo or Lead Nurture Supervisor. The meetings are designed to discuss the impact of the intervention and to identify whether further support is required.

Within the Curriculum Support learning areas progress is tracked using KPI’s on FROG.

If students are progressing well, a discussion is held with parents/carers to decide if intervention is still required. For many students the discussion usually takes place at the end of an academic year when exam results from core subjects are also taken into consideration.

At the end of Key Stage 3, some students are identified to study the Level 1 courses in English and Maths. These courses will form part of the student’s individualized GCSE timetables for Year 10 and 11.

Some students are assessed by outside agencies and revisited throughout the year to measure the impact of the interventions in place.

Students’ progress in reading is measured through the accelerated reader programme. Students who access DEAR support in CS are monitored more closely through a reading log which is completed daily. Their data is analysed termly when the level of support required is re-evaluated.

Dance
Intent

Studying cultural subjects such as Dance, Drama, Music and Art sparks creativity across the curriculum encouraging our students to be inquisitive, disciplined and determined.

Dance at Davison enables our students to gain artistic skills as well as developing their physical interactions, team working, problem solving, observing, analysing, evaluating, verbal and non-verbal communication. Dance improves self-esteem and confidence in our young people; it can widen aspiration and give students a platform to express themselves physically which has a positive impact on mental health.

We aim for all students to have the opportunity to access an extra-curricular programme of participation and performance at all levels.

Content

Year 10

Term 1

  • Ways into Choreography
  • Anthology works 1 and 2 (including written responses – Section C Written paper)
  • Technique Development
  • Set Phrases 1 and 2
  • Section A Written paper

 

Term 2

  • Anthology Works 3 and 4 (including written responses – Section C Written paper)
  • Technique Development
  • Set Phrases 3 and 4
  • Section A Written paper

 

Term 3

  • Anthology work 5 (including written responses – Section C Written paper)
  • Technique Development
  • Development of Performance in a duet or trio
  • Section B Written paper

 

Year 11

Term1

  • Development of Choreography
  • Development of Performance in duet or trio
  • Examination of Choreography/Performance in duet/trio and Set Phrase 1

 

Term 2

  • Examination of Set Phrase 2
  • Anthology work 6 (including written responses – Section C Written paper)
  • Written paper – Revision and exam practice

 

Term 3

  • Written paper – Revision and exam practice
Implementation

Curriculum Delivery

GCSE Dance is taught by 2 subject specialists. Dance is allocated 5 hours of curriculum time per fortnight. Students are taught practical and theory based work together, interwoven to enable them to make the links required to be successful in the C2 written paper. In Year 11 students have 1 formal classroom based lesson focusing on requirements of the written paper and examination technique.

Teaching

Critical thinking and thinking hard

Students are required to learn key threshold concepts related to performance, choreography and analysis. They are required to recall facts and be able to recognise and apply them to their own and others work.

Students develop the ability to describe in detail, to analyse, evaluate and offer personal interpretations of movement and constituent features of professional dance works.

Students develop the ability to learn and apply complicated choreographic principles and concepts to their work as well as solve choreographic problems and challenges.

Modelling and explanation

The learning process in GCSE Dance is structured in the following way:

  • Observation of Professional dance works
  • Description and analysis of key movement and stylistic features
  • Learning carefully selected repertoire
  • Developing selected repertoire to develop form and structure.
  • Analysis and evaluation of own and/or others work using GCSE performance criteria

During the process of learning professional repertoire, students will see movement content demonstrated by the teacher being modelled in the moment. Technical points will be given with regards to action and dynamic content in order for pupil to develop and embody the style of the work being studied.

During written tasks students are provided with model full mark answers. They then develop their own responses with the use of writing frames and structuring guidance which are gradually withdrawn as the course progresses on an individual basis dependant on students grasp of key concepts.

Structured practice of key mastery skills

Throughout the course students will practice and develop key Physical, Expressive, Technical and Mental skills. These will be repeated and refined on an individual basis depending on the students level of experience to ensure all students have the necessary skills to learn and perform the set phrases and duet/trio successfully and safely.

Students will practice choreographic development through structured teacher led tasks which they then apply to their own choreographic work in year 11. Choreographic tasks may relate to:

  • Creating action content which explicitly links to the stimulus
  • Developing action content using a range Choreographic Devices
  • Structuring movement content

Written work is woven throughout the course with structured examination and question practice repeated and applied to different professional dance works. Students will develop skills of detailed description using key adjectives to develop a rich and varied vocabulary. They will analyse key features of the 6 anthology works and be able to make clear links with the choreographic intention of each. Students will practice developing personal interpretations of the professional works which will enable them to access top band marks in the C2 written paper.

Feedback/Feed Forward

Feedback in GCSE dance is continual and ongoing every lesson. During practical tasks students are given immediate verbal feedback:

Performance skills – Individual feedback given
Choreographic skills – Individual and group feedback given.

Students self-assess using mirrors or video recordings and also develop their skills in peer assessment based upon key assessment criteria.

At the end of each unit of study students are assessed against the GCSE criteria in relation to performance and choreography providing them with a benchmark of where they currently sit within grade boundaries. They are given oral and written feedback on an individual basis in order to access the next level on the assessment ladders. This ensures students know what they need to do/practice in order to improve their outcomes.

Written marking and feedback is given for the C2 written paper along with model answers and writing frames. Mark schemes are annotated and provided. Students then remodel answers based upon feedback and marking requirements in order to bring about improvement and practice what is required of top band written answers. This practice is embedded and repeated throughout the 2 year course.

In year 11 a programme of individual intervention is set up as students work towards producing their choreographies (30%). This takes the form of an extra-curricular programme of sessions before school, at lunch time and after school. During these sessions students receive personalised, specific feedback related to action, dynamics, space, relationships, choreographic devices, form and structure and use of music.

Challenge for every student

The GCSE Dance specification is an exceptionally challenging course for all students.
Students will study works designed and performed by professional artists with many years’ worth of dance experience and training.

Even for our most advanced students, studying work in a variety of movement styles often pushes them outside their comfort zone and encourages exploration of techniques not experienced before.

All Students have the opportunity and freedom to demonstrate their learning and skills in an individual context in order to access the higher grade boundaries.

Support and structured feedback enables students with less experience to achieve exceptionally well and also aim for the highest grades.

Differentiation is embodied in every lesson to enable to students to access the curriculum at their own level whilst providing the stretch and challenge required for them to meet and exceed target grades.

Students are provided with guidance and examples to assist them when experiencing moments of ‘struggle’. They are then able to apply this knowledge in new situations in order to practice and embody key threshold concepts throughout the course.

Independence and Self-Regulating Learners.

This concept is vital for the success of all students in GCSE Dance. Dance practitioners need to be self-motivated, independent learners who are able to apply skills learned to practice inside and outside of the classroom to ensure continual improvement.

During year 10 we build these skills through structured tasks that are broken down and layered. Students are required to extend upon these tasks for homework and ‘Flip’ their learning in order to prepare movement content/develop movement content for subsequent lessons.

Teacher guidance is provided when embarking on the organisation of their 30% choreographic task in year 11. This task requires pupils to create their own piece of dance work on a group of between 2 and 5 other young people. The pupils select and refine their dance idea taken from a range of starting points from the exam board. They select their dancers and set their own rehearsal schedule. Create and teach the material. Develop and lead choreographic tasks, structure their material. Select costumes and music all outside of curriculum time.

This task is supported by a teacher prepared workbook and individual intervention sessions to help guide them through the process in an appropriate order.

During lesson time students work on practical aspects in groups or individually and are encouraged to take ownership of their practice time. Each task set is given a specific focus for students to work towards which helps to motivate and ensure a high level of activity in the lesson. The nature of the dance course often means groups of students work in different teaching spaces. Students are extremely hard working and motivated to succeed even when not under the direct supervision of the class teacher. Exceptional outcomes are always reached with performances shared at the end of lesson time.

Approximately 1 to 1.5 hours independent study work is set per week.

Assessment

Formative assessment is ongoing throughout the course. Explained above.

All formal summative assessment performances happen in year 11.
Set Phrase 1, Performance in duet/trio and Choreography – November/December of

Autumn Term

Set Phrase 2 plus any outstanding assessments from the Autumn are completed in Spring 1.
C2 Written paper – May/June in the Summer term.

Extra-Curricular Programme and Opportunities

All students in years 8, 9 and 10 have the opportunity to participate in an annual Colour Family Dance event at Worthing Pavilion Theatre. This enables all students to experience and perform in a professional venue in front of an audience.

All year groups have weekly Dance clubs to which all students are welcome and encouraged to attend. At least one performance platform per year is provided for each year group for all students who wish to be involved.

Key Stage 3 and 4 Dance Companies rehearse weekly and provide opportunities for our gifted and talented dancers to be challenged and perform on local and national platforms.
Opportunities to take part in professional dance workshops are provided annually along with Theatre visits to motivate and enthuse students and develop their passion for watching professional dance artists and companies.

Impact

Student progress is monitored closely throughout the course. GCSE assessment criteria is used at regular intervals for benchmarking in performance and choreographic aspects. Written work is marked/assessed, feedback given, students then respond and make improvements. This practice is embedded

GCSE Dance outcomes at Davison are consistently higher than the national average.

GCSE Outcomes 2019

Results
6+ 100%
7 + 94%
8 + 76%
9 + 41%

P8 Score = 3
A8 = 57.94
APS = 8.12

Design & Technology
Intent

The Design and Technology department incorporates a number of subjects within its curriculum framework: Food and Nutrition, Textile Products, and Product Design. Thus, offering a unique introduction to the creative, engineering and manufacturing sectors.

Design and Technology presents students with the opportunity to learn about a wide range of industry-relevant skills, including creative design thinking, engineering, working with range of high and low level materials. It combines conceptual thinking with practical skills towards the solution of “real-life” problems. Through experiencing practical contextual challenges, students develop the transferable skills and attitudes (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Maths – STEAM) highly valued by employers, including: communication, team work, resilience, analytical skills and problem solving.

As part of the ‘Iterative Design Process’ our students utilise their creative and practical skills to incorporate intellectual capabilities that relate to a wider understanding of aesthetic, technical, cultural, historic, health, social, emotional, economic, industrial and environmental issues.

The subject five year curriculum plan, during KS3 and KS4, provides project contexts that are stimulating and provide a range of opportunities for students to identify needs and opportunities in a variety of contexts, within a variety of environments and within a variety of materials. Most of all our students always work creatively and are motivated to succeed. The subject takes students out of their intellectual and social comfort zone, encourages the transference of knowledge and skills experienced elsewhere in the curriculum and demonstrates that failure is rarely an end point; it is instead a necessary part of a longer journey to success.

Content

DAVISON CE HIGH SCHOOL FOR GIRLS Teachers: Mr Boswell, Mrs Green & Mr Frampton Technician: L. Poland/ H. Lawler

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY 5 YEAR FRAMEWORK SEPT 2019

Build GCSE skills knowledge & understanding of DT as a subject up from Y7

Developing our young engineers skills and knowledge so they are able to problem solve real issues with real solutions for a need and a purpose.

Teaching KS3 = 2 hours a fortnight. KS4 = 5 hours a fortnight

FROG – CENTRAL SOURCE for Marking, comments, visions of success, department resources and evidence of students work.

Year 7

Safety products

Origins & classification of Fibres.
Construction of fabrics.
Science of reflective and high viz materials.
Artist’s inspiration.
How a sewing machine works.
How to press using an iron.
Developing a stencil.

Healthy Lifestyle promotion

Levers & linkages
CAM’s
Papers & boards
Types of woods
Types of glues
Classes of Lever
Isometric projection
Types of hand tools
Health and safety in the work shop
Preparing healthy dishes safely and hygienically
Hazards in the kitchen and how to minimise risk
Food safety
Using equipment and washing up
Use of ovens
Recognising ingredients and date markings
Ethics and food consumption

Year 8

Product to encourage wildlife into urban landscapes

Product to Encourage proactive learning and focus

Forces & structures
Cardboard engineering
Surface pattern design
Series circuit electronics
Systems input & output
Smart Modern & reactive materials.

Robots for jobs

Robotics
Forces
Structures
Materials tolerances
Materials testing
Elasticity
Team production
Factory settings

8 Healthy Eating Tips

Dealing with high risk foods
Government guidance on healthy eating
Nutrients and their functions
Key temperatures – fridge, freezer, cooking and reheating
Adjusting recipes to improve health
Making healthy choices
Denaturation and coagulation of proteins

Year 9

Young Enterprise pitching a promotional product to a company
‘corporate identity’
Product development

Iterative design process
Rapid concept modelling
Social moral ethical values.
Life cycle of products.
Sustainable materials.
Plastics
Product analysis

Addressing mental health when studying & work

Anthropometrics
Ergonomics
Storage of electricity (oil, gas, coal, windfarm, nuclear)
Sustainability
Electronics
Moulding plastics
Orthographic projection
Health & safety in the work place

Planning for a healthy diet

Nutrient requirements – DRV
Fortification of food products
Raising agents and methods
Standard and alternative thickening agents
Planning for a healthy diet
Aeration, gelatinisation, caramelisation and dextrinization.
Alternative protein sources

KS4 FASHION & TEXTILES core – wrap around other elements to compliment DT GCSE framework SEPT 2019 Davison CE High School for Girls Teachers: JGR Technician: L. Poland

Year 10

Fashion Revolution

  • Different weaves and types of fabric construction
  • Pattern cutting
  • Promoting your fashion company
  • Using designers, cultures and eras to be inspired by
  • Developing sewing machine skills
  • Surface manipulation techniques
  • Social moral ethical values

Healthy Lifestyle

  • Levers & linkages.
  • Types of woods
  • Types of glues
  • Classes of Lever
  •  Working drawings = Orthographic projection
  • Types of hand tools
  • Environmental issues.
  • Looking at needs and wants – market pull.
  • Modelling work.

Making someone’s life easier

  • Forces & structures
  • Cardboard engineering
  • Surface pattern design
  • Series circuit electronics
  • Instructional drawings.
  • Smart Modern & reactive materials.
  • Looking at client analysis

Mental Health awareness

  • Health and safety in the work shop.
  • Forces on materials
  • How to build Structure
  • What does tolerance mean?
  • Materials testing
  • Team production
  • Components and uses
  • Graphic presentation

Festival fancy

  • Iterative design process
  • Lifecycle of products.
  • Sustainable materials.
  • Analysing the work of designers.
  • Marketing your company and concept

Year 11

NEA 5O% GCSE AND CARRIES ON TILL MARCH
Contexts given out by the exam board CHOOSE 1

  • A high profile sporting event
  • Addressing the needs of the elderly
  • Children’s learning and play
  • Developing researches
  • Purging ideas
  • Talking to your client
  • Rapid concept modelling

 

Implementation

KS3 – we have between 10- 12 hours per student per academic year, for each of the contexts studied by students (approximately). This is based around a three rotation system, where students will visit a variety of contexts and materials with different teachers. This equates to 2 hours in the two-week timetable. All classes are mixed ability. We mostly have double lesson every two weeks (where this is at all possible – some are single lessons) where we provide demonstration, provision of equipment and use of environment to safely prepare products students are attempting to manufacture. The bulk of our class time is used for practical work, mixed with research and design activities. Student’s complete work in a variety of ways in design books, digitally, three dimensionally.

Some SEND students at KS3 are taken out of Design & Technology for literacy and numeracy intervention.

The department plan collaboratively and individually on specific design and technology contexts. The team share resources and good practise regularly in our meetings. We frequently discuss the sequencing of topics and are consistently reflecting and evaluating on the impact of tasks and topics within the rotation model we use. We are constantly developing new methodology and adding new resources to enable students, developing the FROG learning lockers and importantly the department websites specifically in the past eighteen months.

Within lessons a variety of techniques are used to deliver content or skills (using our five year plan, SOW, FROG and Course Materials). We aim to strike an effective balance between teacher input with active discovery of learning, creative and research tasks, debate/discussion and the development and practice of key skills/techniques. Design & Technology lessons often underpin the SMSC values of Davison, particularly social and moral questions by asking the big questions related to our contextual challenges.

The KS3 curriculum offers regular opportunities for deep and critical thinking, challenging tasks and forming clear thoughts about contexts. All lessons include challenge tasks to develop thinking further and design ideas that meet a context. We ensure equality of opportunity by making lessons inclusive (this can be through a variety of ways, including use of technician support in lesson, storytelling, visual clues, questioning, explanation of key vocabulary etc.)

We have an extensive subject web pages on our VLE (FROG) which has a dedicated section for each year group containing activities, tasks, support information and resources. Learning lockers contain exemplar materials and homework is set upon this platform. This links parents into the loop of communication and also serves as a reliable way to inform about tasks and homework.

In KS3 all KPI’s are visited at least once in a number of contexts and materials, developing and complexity each year. The KPIs have been carefully developed to prepare pupils for the challenges of GCSE questions.

We have a structured practice of Key Mastery Skills, with support via the department FROG website. Assessment is directed and manageable during the short rotations, where we provide both verbal and written feedback to students, both digitally and written.

Department meetings offer regular opportunities to discuss pupil progress and curriculum planning priorities.

Modelling and exemplars are used regularly to promote pupil understanding of what a higher level answer looks like. These are shown clearly via both the learning lockers and the department FROG website.

Department have reviewed marking and workload to ensure that marking is manageable, targeted and effective.

Teachers evaluate the needs of their classes and plan accordingly to address skill gaps. Department meetings offer regular opportunities to discuss pupil progress and planning priorities.

KS4 – 5 hours per fortnight across the year. The majority of the GCSE content is taught in year 10, which allows for NEA to be completed in the bulk of year 11. Titles for NEA tasks are published in September. We aim to finish NEA work by the end of March. There is a mock exam in year 10 and January of year 11.

Our VLE (Frog) is used extensively and knowledge, information, exemplar and model work is included as well as many useful links.

Students work both digitally and manually, which are regularly marked as well as being given a written statement each term which informs them of their progress and provides formative feedback.

Within KS3 and 4, there is a heavy focus on practical work as this keeps students engaged in this subject. The slight exception to this is in year 11 in which there is an added focus on written (typed) NEA work and exam preparation.

Impact

In Design & Technology we focus on specific key KPIs for design and food, the same KPIs are visited in years 7, 8 and 9 with increasing challenge and new context allowing a really strong understanding of the key skills required for progress in Design & Technology. By focusing on using research and contextual themes we confidently believe pupils have the opportunity to explore the skills and knowledge necessary to progress to GCSE. Within each context there is a focus on Design, Evaluate, Making and Technical Knowledge KPI’s. This allows staff to support pupils to really challenge themselves and develop these skills.

Pupil voice in lesson observations, learning walks and via the FROG VLE is always positive and indicates high levels of pupil enjoyment and an understanding of the relevance of Design & Technology.

Behaviour in D&T indicates that students are engaged and show real enjoyment as well as effort in this area – particularly the practical element.

The majority of student’s complete homework tasks to a good standard.

There is a high uptake of D&T clubs by key stage 3 students and key stage 4 helpers/prefects.

National competition uptake – an external competition is held within school to which many wish to compete (vast majority of GCSE groups taking part)

We have many links with industry – local company involvement – related to extended learning and as part of the discrete curriculum.

Links to FE – many of our student’s progress to Northbrook or Chichester FE colleges to continue D&T related courses

KPI results show high levels of attendance and success.

GCSE results – above national average – 2019 88% 9-4 with a high P8

The Design and Technology departments continues to use the AQA exam board, as context content at Key Stage 3 is be a solid foundation for this KS4 course. We consistently achieve exam results above the national average in this academically rigorous subject.

Assessment at Key Stage 4 is based on exam questions, contexts, knowledge, practical skills and providing formative and summative feedback to help pupils improve. By the time pupils start NEA’s and lead onto written exams they should be confident in the content of the exam process and how to approach exam/ contextual questions and tasks.

Where students have followed a Design and Technology course, there has been a good uptake in Post-16 courses. We currently have an uptake above the national average for girls taking the subject, but not enough to run a group in either Yr10 or Yr11.

Drama
Intent

Drama is both as aesthetic, practical subject, but also a vehicle to promote deep thinking, discussion and issues across the curriculum. Students will have widely varying backgrounds from their primary experience and own cultural capital: some will have had West End and industry experience whilst others yet find the subject daunting and will be approaching it with very limited experience. We aim to provide a subject where all students can thrive, build confidence, develop skills and expertise and appreciate Drama both as a performer and as a considered audience member.

Content

Year 7

Term1

  • Exploring techniques through Myths, Fairytales and Folklore
  • Techniques delivered: Still images, split staging, flashback, flashforwards, use of narrator, thought-tracking and other basic drama techniques.
  • KPI2: You can carry out a performance at a basic level.
  • KPI4: You can recognise at least three drama techniques.

 

Term 2

  • Heroines

Students explore through Drama women who have shaped the world. A vareity of styles will be used: scripts, improvisation, verbatim and docu-drama. Devising techniques form The Paper Birds will be developed working towards a final assessed performance. Heroines include, but are not limited to Malala Yousfi, Rosa Parks, Florence Nightingale, Anne Frank, Greta Thurnberg, Grace Darling

KPI You can create a functional piece which meets the brief

KPI You can make a simple evaluative judgment to a piece of work.

Term 3

  • Friendship explored through the script Blood Brothers
  • Mickey and Eddie key scenes
  • Kids’ Game staged as whole class (musical theatre)

KPI You can learn and perform a short scene (perhaps with prompt needed)

KPI You can produce a recognisable character

Year 8

Term1

  • Scripted Scenes exploring relationships (recognising healthy/unhealthy markers)
  • Referencing the practitioner, Stanislavksi, consider naturalistic techniques in your acting.

KPI5 You can learn and perform a sustained scene

KPI6: You can produce a recognisable character with focus

Term 2

  • The Match Girls and Women Protestors – (docu-drama)

Students will explore moments from history when protestors stood up for what they thought to be an injustice. Topics will include The Match Girls and Annie Bessant, The Women’s March on Versailes 1789, The Million Mom March (anti-gun violence) (2000)

KPI You can create a functional piece which meets the brief

KPI You can make a simple evaluative judgement to a piece of work

Term 3

  • A Taste of Theatre – exploring theatre history
  • Greek theatre, Shakespeare, 20th century

KPI You can create a satisfying piece showing some originality

KPI You can carry out a performance with focus and consistency

Year 9

Term1

  • “Girls Like That” scripted contemporary play and technique development
    This play exposes the online world our young people face and issues around texting, sexting, reputation, exposure, friendship and peer relationships. Current legislation is investigated to look at the legalities of some of these issues to tie in with relationship work and practical Drama technique should now be developed to a more sophisticated level.

KPI 4 You can recognise and effectively demonstrate a range of techniques

KPI2 You can carry out a performance with confidence and an awareness of the audience

Term 2

  • Devising from Stimuli (connected to GCSE Component 2)

Styles will be explored including Frantic Assembly and The Paper Birds.

Students are grouped and have to collaborate to create an effective piece using research and devising techniques. Written work is collated and submitted as a group project with individual components.

KPI You can create a sustained piece showing originality.

KPI You can make a sophisticated evaluative judgement to a piece of work.

Term 3

  • Topic List

Year 10

Term1

  • Set Text work (Blood Brothers or A Midsummer Night’s Dream) (Section B of AQA GCSE Drama component One)
  • Knowledge and Understanding of Roles in the Theatre (Component One, Section A of AQA GCSE Drama)

The text will be explored practically in order for students to access the written paper. Detailed examples of practical work need to be described to the examiner so the students will have experienced presenting many scenes from the text and exploring the challenges within.

Theatre Knowledge and Understanding will include looking at staging, roles in the theatre, descriptions of specific terms and technical knowledge too.

Term 2

  • Exploring practitioners: Stanislavski, Brecht, The Paper Birds. Different eras have produced different styles of theatre. Why has this happened and what is unique or successful in the different practitioners? Again, students will explore this practically but be able to identify the individuality of each style.
  • Students will also experience a ‘mock’ of Component 2 – they will produce a shorter version of the devised work that will need to be submitted and will also produce an accompanying log book.
  • Component 3 ‘mock’. For component 3, students have to deliver two extracts from a published play, within time limits according to group size. For the ‘mock’ version of this, they will just have one scene to deliver from a wide and challenging selection of plays.

Term 3

  • Component 2 explored and delivered. Students will spend the whole term researching, refining, performing and evaluating their final devised piece which will be submitted to the moderators in the final term of their course. This will be performed to parents and filmed and recorded.

Year 11

Term1

  • Component 3 prep and research and Section C (component one) exploration.
    Term 2
  • Component two (depending on the availability of visiting examiner) and component one revision.

Term 3

  • Revision.
Implementation

Critical thinking and thinking hard

The GCSE Drama course is exceptionally challenging course where performance skills not only have to be demonstrated at a high level, but the students have to also describe and analyse their performances and that of professional performers. Students have to develop a language in performance and find the vocabulary to define it. At GCSE one lesson per fortnight is dedicated to classroom work with access to computers and on line dictionaries and thesauruses in order to develop these skills.

Impact

What is the progress and achievement like in your subject? Frog /GCSE results.

How do you monitor their progress and how does intervention work? This does not need to be details analyses of grades just a brief summary.

2019 GCSE results:
4+ 77.27
7+ 36.36
P8 0.61 or 0.15 CHECK

English
Intent

Studying English allows students to build their literacy skills which are transferable across the curriculum. We provide a creative and engaging curriculum for our students in order for them to develop a love of reading, writing and the spoken word. We draw on a variety of texts and stimuli to motivate and inspire students into engaging with the wider world around them. We provide a curriculum which allows our students to leave Davison as confident and effective communicators.

Content

Year 7

Term1

  • White Poppies drama text
  • ‘Christmas is Coming’ unit looking at a range of Christmas texts including modern non-fiction prose/poetry and pre 1914 extracts

 

Term 2

  • Pre 1914 novel (extracts) or pre 1914 short story study
  • Thematic poetry unit

Term 3

  • ‘Magic In Shakespeare’ unit looking at a range of extracts from a variety of Shakespeare plays
  • ‘Journey, Place and Settings’ non-fiction unit

Year 8

Term1

  • Modern novel
  • ‘Cultures Around The World’ unit looking at extracts and poetry

Term 2

  • Romeo and Juliet

Term 3

  • Modern poetry unit
  • Pre 1914 short story unit

Year 9

Term1

  • Of Mice and Men
  • Christmas texts non-fiction unit

Term 2

  • Dystopian fiction unit
  • GCSE Paper 1 reading skills unit
  • Unseen poetry

Term 3

  • Current affairs research and speech writing unit
  • Tragedy unit

Year 10 GCSE Language

Term1

  • Viewpoints reading and writing
  • Engaging with literary texts unit

Term 2

  • Paper One reading skills
  • Creative writing using images as inspiration

Term 3

  • Paper Two reading skills
  • Revisit viewpoints writing

 

Year 11 GCSE Language

Term1

  • Paper One reading skills
  • Narrative writing
  • Revisit creative writing based on images

Term 2

  • Revisit Paper Two reading skills
  • Revisit viewpoints writing
  • Revisit narrative writing

Term 3

  • Exam technique revision

Year 10 GCSE Literature

Term1

  • Macbeth
  • A Christmas Carol

Term 2

  • A Christmas Carol
  • An Inspector Calls

Term 3

  • Love and Relationships poetry
  • Revisit Macbeth
  • Revisit A Christmas Carol

Year 11 GCSE Literature

Term1

  • Love and Relationships poetry
  • Revisit An Inspector Calls

Term 2

  • Love and Relationships poetry
  • Revisit Macbeth
  • Revisit A Christmas Carol

Term 3

  • Exam technique revision
Implementation

Critical Thinking and Thinking Hard

 

Modelling and Explanation

Modelling is fundamental in demonstrating required skills to students in English. We use a variety of different ways to make extend standards clear to our students including:

  • Teachers model in the moment by demonstrating constructing a piece of writing or answer live in front the class.
  • Students’ examples are used as model answers to show effective work and also to unpick what might need to be improved.
  • Highly effective writing is regularly experienced by the students through using relevant and topical examples from the media and literature to inspire them.

 

Structured Practice of Key Mastery Skills
The Key Performance Indicators we use at Key Stage 3 feed directly into the KS4 GCSE Assessment Objectives. This system allows our students to develop skills over the 5 years which will help them to be successful at GCSE level. Key Performance Indicators are layered over years 7, 8 and 9 adding more challenging skills and texts in each year and revisiting core skills regularly.

At Key Stage 3, students are required to independently evidence achievement of each Key Performance Indicator twice each year in order to secure them. Records of evidence are kept on tracking sheets within students’ assessment portfolio books and are also recorded on FROG.

Students are set targets linked to their success in evidencing Key performance Indicators and regularly complete Progress Paragraphs after receiving targets to show how their work can be improved. Personalised KPI boost activities are set for students to complete independently to help support their development of skills.
Embed KPI rainbow document and layering document

Support: For students working below the expected standards of their year group, there are Working Towards standards statements for each KPI which are from the year below where the expected standards are. This allows us to record progress even though they may not be working at the expected standards.

Challenge; Students who are clearly working at the expected levels early in the year are able to access the expected levels of the next academic year group and if they demonstrate these they are awarded an ‘excelling’ rather than ‘expected’ judgement on FROG.

Due to the nature of the GCSE course we follow at Key Stage 4, students revisit topics and skills regularly throughout the two year course. We use retrieval practice, spaced learning and interleaving principles to help students develop their understanding and skills and to apply their knowledge effectively.

Feedback / Feedforward

Each KS3 unit has a self/peer assessed task as well as at least one independent KPI assessment.

Before each independent assessment, a supported task is completed using teacher modelling and self-assessment to feedforward into formative assessments. KPI assessments are marked using a success criteria and targets are set from this.

Students are given the opportunity to respond to feedback in a variety of ways depending on the task including:

  • Correcting identified spelling errors
  • Completing a KPI boost HW to address a GPS issue such as punctuation errors
  • Completing a Learning Locker KPI task
  • Improving a paragraph/rewriting a section of the assessment
  • Individual discussion with teacher
  • When KPIs are revisited, students are given time to look back at the last piece of work they completed on the same skill and set themselves targets for the next piece to ensure it is better than the last

Challenge for Every Student
Lessons regularly contain layered tasks which students work through. Some students will start at a high level task which requires deeper thinking skills whilst others will work up towards this level of independent thought,

Independence and Self-regulated learners

Each unit of work has additional materials on FROG to extend learners such as contextual reading, high level vocabulary, links to online masterclasses which students are encouraged to access.

Student engagement with independent learning tasks is rewarded through the school ATL reporting system.

Impact

What is the progress and achievement like in your subject? Frog /GCSE results.

How do you monitor their progress and how does intervention work? This does not need to be details analyses of grades just a brief summary.

FROG analysis – what percentage of students in each year group meet expected standards in all KPIs?

ARP data?GCSE results 2019:
Language: 91% 4+ (NA 62%) / 37% 7+ (NA 16%)
Literature: 88% 4+ (NA 74%) / 41% 7+ (NA 11%)

Intervention:
We provide additional support for our PP students through fortnightly sessions with our Raising Attainment Coach at KS4.
KS3 reading intervention RAC?College choices:

2019 applications

English Literature 10
English Language 2
English Literature and Language combined 82020 application
English Literature 15
English Language 15

Apologies as I didn’t give the combined choice as an option on the feedback form, so some of these will no doubt be combined.

HE courses in recent years 2017 from Worthing College

Food Preparation and Nutrition
Intent

We aim to give our students at KS3, the knowledge and practice required to be able to safely and hygienically prepare and cook healthy food for themselves and their families.
The key priorities are; personal safety in a kitchen environment, food hygiene to include food purchasing, storage, safe preparation and cooking of food, high risk foods, guidance on allergens, healthy eating guidance, food provenance and an introduction to food science.

We aim to inspire learners to cook healthy and creative dishes independently after practising and developing their skills in school. We hope to encourage our students to cook fresh food for themselves in place of ready and convenience meals, takeaways and other less healthy options. We aim to empower our students with the realisation that adapting behaviours around diet and food preparation can bring improvements to health as well as financial and environmental benefits.

The key Stage 3 curriculum allows for a smooth transition into our GCSE option where students will be building upon this knowledge as well as developing more advanced food preparation and cooking applications. At key stage 4, we aim to provide a more in-depth knowledge of nutrition, with a deeper understanding of specific nutrients their sources, functions, excesses and deficiencies. We also seek a wider and more in-depth grasp of food science and subsequent application; for example: denaturation of protein and its application within meat cookery, aeration and its application with meringue making, gelatinisation and its role within sauce making.

We aim to deepen understanding of food provenance with a focus on benefits and drawbacks to the consumer, the environment and local/international communities.

We aim to encourage a passion for cooking and presenting meals and food products and the development of a range of skills required for this aim.

Content

We have one third of an academic year in years 7, 8 and 9. We have two hours per fortnight in a double lesson during this timeframe. This gives us roughly 12 hours each year to deliver our content. Much of this time will be taken up with practical application

Year 7

KPIs – You can follow recipes given and show a range of culinary skills demonstrating safe and hygienic working.

You can demonstrate an awareness of social/ moral/ ethical issues linked to food production and can discuss pro’s and cons for these

You can give reasons for your choices when designing your own dish and starts to make links to nutrition and/or sensory qualities

You can write about your practical work and food in terms of it’s sensory qualities, nutritional content, health, hygiene and safety in making it and the new and developing skills you have shown. You also may draw in any food science elements that are relevant.

You understand the principles of the Eatwell Guide and can Identify a number of food types for each section

Our set practical applications and subsequent theory attached in year 7 is as follows: Pizza (healthy eating), Bolognese, scones, deli salad, bread making and a chosen product based on what they have already made.

Demonstration and class teaching will bring the theory and practical together. An example being the understanding of moral and ethical issues related to food being linked with the Bolognese making or the food science (functions of ingredients) being linked to the bread making task.

Classwork (making examples and written work) and homework tasks will allow students to demonstrate their skills and knowledge.

Year 8

KPIs – You can apply the principles of safe and hygienic food handling to your practical work, which demonstrates your understanding of how to make dishes which are safe to eat as well as appetising and wholesome.

You can demonstrate, through practical and written work, a clear understanding of the nutritional content of your dishes and what a balanced diet looks like and why this is beneficial to our health

You can independently make a range of dishes showing a variety of skills and working safely and hygienically. A detailed evaluation is carried out for at least one practical session which includes analysis of nutrition, practical working, teamwork, sensory qualities and how each of these aspects could be improved.

You understand the 8 tips for eating healthy and can explain ways to achieve them using at least one reference showing that some research has taken place

Our set practical applications and subsequent knowledge attached in year 8 is as follows: Fajitas, fish goujons and wedges, carrot cakes, vegetable stir fry, empanadas, pizza swirls and a chosen application of their own. In year 8, we start to encourage students to bring their own adaptations to dishes where appropriate.

Demonstration and class teaching will bring theory concepts together with practical application – for example the goujons lesson leads naturally into the development of the concept of the healthy plate and the Eatwell Guide and the government’s 8 healthy eating tips.

Classwork (making examples and written work) and homework tasks will allow students to demonstrate their skills and knowledge.

Year 9

KPIs – You can independently and accurately make a range of sweet and savoury dishes showing a variety of skills and appropriate consideration of nutrition and the provenance of ingredients. You can show also how recipes could be adapted to improve these aspects

You can write a detailed and accurate plan for cooking which draws in the nutritional, sensory and economic considerations of food choice

You can design a dish that meets a set brief and fully explains and justifies your choices

You can demonstrate a high level of hygiene, safety and organisation and can explain why it is important

You can carry out detailed evaluations of their making and final products in terms of food science, health and safety, hygiene, practical skills, sensory qualities, nutrition and provenance. This work will contain detailed suggestions for improvements and their own testing methods for the foods

Our set practical applications and subsequent knowledge attached in year 9 is as follows: Breakfast tarts, enriched bread application, chicken chickpea and spinach curry, Mexican bean chilli and wedges, lemon meringue pie and a choice of assessed practical requiring high level skills.

Classwork (making examples and written work) and homework tasks will allow students to demonstrate their skills and knowledge.

KS4 – OCR Food Preparation and Nutrition GCSE

A link to their website provides a curriculum at a glance

https://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/gcse/food-preparation-and-nutrition-j309-from-2016/specification-at-a-glance/

This course is delivered thus:

Week 1 – Bread making, functions of ingredients, raising agents, basic hygiene requirements

Week 2 – 3 – Nutrition – sources, functions of macro and micro nutrients

Week 4, 5 and 6 – raising agents – steam for puff pastry and choux pastry, aeration for Swiss roll

Food safety, food poisoning, temperatures, danger zone, fridge and freezer and cooking temperatures.

Week 7 – Health conditions and diet – obesity (weight loss and gain), cardiovascular, coronary heart disease (CHD), diabetes, diverticulitis, bone health (osteoporosis), dental health, anaemia and high blood pressure

Week 8 – Food Science terms – an introduction

Week 9, 10, 11 – Preparing a balanced meal, presenting dishes for assessment or competition in a timeframe

Week 12 and 13 – Food provenance – Fairtrade, locally sourced food, seasonal food, carbon footprint, organic, free range, intensive farming, fishing methods – classifications of fish.

Week 14 – Secondary food production – Dairy products and how they’re made – milk into yogurt, cheese, butter. Flour based products (bread and pasta)

Week 15 – Food preservation methods.

Week 16 – Food security – moral issues. Factors affecting food choice

Week 17 – additives and fortification

Week 18, 19, 20 – Food Science – why food is cooked, cooking methods, heat transfer, the food science terms

Week 21 – Sensory properties of food – testing panels

Week 22 – Food Safety – revisit

Week 23 – nutrition revisit – functions, sources

Week 24 – Nutrition – diets for individuals with particular needs

Week 25 – Provenance revisit

Week 26 and 27 – High level skills check – fish, meat prep etc

Week 28 – Roux based sauces – gelatinisation

Week 29 – Emulsified sauces – mayonnaise

Week 30 – Equipment in the kitchen – knives, utensils, larger and electrical equipment – safety.

Week 31-35 – Mock preparation and completion

Week 36-39 – NEA preparation

Year 11

From September – November NEA1

From November to February – NEA2

Homework to be set from September onwards in preparation for our mock exam in January

From March to June – Revision and exam practice

Implementation

KS3 – 12 hours per student per academic year (approx), mixed ability classes. We have a double lesson every two weeks (where this is at all possible) in which we provide a demonstration and the provision of equipment and environment in which to safely prepare and cook dishes and food products. Students provide their own ingredients and are encouraged, particularly as they get older, to take ownership of this organisation (exception – pupil premium). Girls work in tables/kitchen areas, which they are collectively responsible for the cleaning and tidying of. The bulk of our class time is used for practical work although potential dead time is filled with requirement to produce written evaluation and other written activities.

We have a work book which we give to students containing recipes and other tasks to complete. Other written work that is produced is placed into the booklet for assessment.

We have an extensive subject web page on our VLE (Frog) which has a dedicated section for each year group containing activities, recipes, information and knowledge. Learning lockers contain exemplar materials and homework is set upon this platform. This links parents into the loop of communication and also serves as a reliable way to inform about ingredients.

KS4 – 5 hours per fortnight across the year. The majority of the content for GCSE is taught in year 10, which allows for NEA to be completed in the bulk of year 11. Titles for NEA tasks are published in September and then November. We aim to finish NEA work by the end of February. There is a mock exam in year 10 and January of year 11.

Once again our VLE (Frog) is used extensively and knowledge, information, exemplar and model work is included as well as many useful links.

Students work in exercise books which are regularly marked as well as being given a written statement each term which informs them of their progress and provides formative feedback.

Within KS3 and 4, there is a heavy focus on practical work as this keeps students engaged in this subject. The slight exception to this is in year 11 in which there is an added focus on written (typed) NEA work and exam preparation.

Impact

KS3 – the vast majority of students bring ingredients which demonstrates commitment and motivation. The behaviour indicates that students are engaged and show real enjoyment as well as effort in this area – particularly the practical element.

Majority of students complete homework tasks to a good standard.

High uptake of food club by key stage 3 students and key stage 4 helpers/prefects
National competition uptake – an external competition is held within school to which many wish to compete (vast majority of GCSE groups taking part)

Links with industry – local companies involvement – Higgidy, Porridge Company
Links to FE – many of our students progress to Northbrook or Chichester FE colleges to continue food related courses.

KPI results show high levels of attendance and succes

GCSE results – above national average, high P8

Geography
Intent

Geography helps students to understand their place in a complex and increasingly interconnected world. As we teach students about the human and physical processes and features of our planet, we want them to take joy in difference and become increasingly informed global citizens.

We want to allow students to be curious about the world around them, understanding the part they can play in providing the world with a more hopeful future, using and developing their decision-making skills, their empathy and applying their fieldwork skills to real life situations.

Content

Year 7

Term 1

Geographical Skills
UK geography
Migration
Middle East

Term 2

Water Cycle
River Processes and features
Fieldwork
Flooding – UK case study

Term 3

South Downs National Park

  • Geology and Geological Timescales
  • OS Map Skills

Globalisation
India

Year 8

Term 1

Atlas Skills
Population distribution
Population Change
Russia
Climate Change
Use of Natural Resources
Fieldwork

Term 2

Tropical Storms
Effects of climate change on natural hazards
India case study
Ecosystems – Climate, Adaptations, Conflicts and Management

Term 3

Regeneration in Worthing
Fieldwork
GIS
OS Map skills
Decision making

Year 9

Term 1

Coastal Processes and Protection
Fieldwork
Worthing case study
International Development
Ghana case study

Term 2

Plate Tectonics
Earthquakes – Nepal and NZ case studies
Economic Activity
China case study

Term 3

Glaciation
GIS
Lake District case study
Tourism
OS map skills

Year 10

Term 1

Urban Issues and Challenges:

  • Global Urban Change
  • NEE City Case Study
  • UK City Case Study
  • Sustainable Cities

Human Geography Fieldwork: New England Quarter, Brighton

Natural Hazards:

  • Definition + risk factors
  • Plate tectonic theory
  • Earthquake effects, responses, management

Term 2

Natural Hazards:

  • Tropical Storm formation and distribution
  • Tropical storm effects, responses, management
  • UK weather hazards
  • Climate Change

Physical Landscapes – Rivers:

  • River processes and features
  • Flooding causes, effects and management

Term 3

Changing Economic World:

  • Causes and consequences of uneven development
  • Reducing the development gap
  • NEE Case Study

Issue Evaluation: Tourism in Bali

Year 11

Term 1

Changing Economic World:

  • UK case study

Physical Landscapes – Coasts:

  • Coastal processes and features
  • Coastal management

Physical Geography Fieldwork: Newhaven Beach

The Living World:

  • Distribution and characteristics of Ecosystems
  • Tropical Rainforest characteristics
  • Tropical Rainforest opportunities and challenges
  • Managing the Tropical Rainforest

Term 2

Issue Evaluation: Peruvian Amazon road building

The Living World:

  • Hot Desert characteristics
  • Hot Desert opportunities and challenges
  • Managing desertification

The challenge of resource management:

  • Food, energy and water in the UK
  • Food demand and supply
  • Increasing food supply

Term 3

Issue Evaluation: Pre-release

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Implementation

A team of four geography subject specialists deliver the curriculum. Students learn a range of physical, human and skills-based topics, with strong links between topics, demonstrated by the 9 KPIs we use to assess students in KS3.

In KS4 human and physical topics are interwoven along with practical fieldwork opportunities and decision-making exercises through the use of issue evaluation tasks.

Critical Thinking and Thinking Hard

  • Encourage students to think deeply about the work they are doing e.g. by reducing, transforming, ranking, categorising and comparing information.
  • Using graphs and maps, to identify trends, use evidence to form arguments, identify anomalies and use mathematical and statistical skills to inform ideas.
  • Give students opportunities to be critical about the typically western worldview, critique resources and understand what makes reliable data e.g. sample size.

 

Modelling and Explanation

  • Using physical modelling where appropriate e.g. actions, practical demonstrations
  • Model in the moment by demonstrating constructing a piece of writing or answer live in front the class.
  • Use students’ examples as model answers to show effective work.
  • Use examples of work to unpick what might need to be improved.
  • Exemplar work for KS3 against each KPI can be found on Frog

 

Structured Practice of Key Mastery Skills

  • Key geographical skills e.g. map, graph, fieldwork, numeracy and GIS skills to be practised regularly across the Key stages
  • KS3 Assessments which are similar in style and language to GCSE assessments
  • Encourage focused practice that replicates exam conditions
  • Regular quizzing e.g. using AfL techniques such as mini whiteboards to inter-leave topics
  • Dual coding of key terms to promote recall

 

Feedback / Feedforward

  • Employ a range of verbal / written feedback strategies with targeted areas for development.
  • Allow students opportunities to respond to feedback, whether immediately through feedback response time, or later by linking similar tasks and topics.

 

Challenge for Every Student

  • Ensure students are deep-thinking rather than task busy
  • Give space for students to discuss and ask geographical questions
  • Have a dedicated resource bank of challenge tasks and questions for students to use
  • Make explicit links to up-to-date case studies, and geographical career opportunities, at relevant points in the curriculum

 

Independence and Self-regulated learners

  • Give students opportunities for learning independently through group work and presentations at least one per year.
  • Give students regular fieldwork opportunities, both on and off the school grounds.
  • Use differentiated homework tasks to promote independence outside the classroom.
  • Challenge tasks are embedded into planning, with tasks on slides.
Impact

In KS3 Progress is monitored using Frog. In Y7 students work towards 7 KPIs and in Y8 and 9 they work towards 9 KPIs. These are assessed regularly in lessons, moderated at least termly in department meetings, and recorded on Frog at least termly

The Subject Leader monitors students who are under-performing, and the department discuss these students at department meetings, and make use of KPI Boost time to support their progress.

In KS4, students are monitored using mixed exam questions, which take place in lessons approximately half-termly, and using two sets of Mock exams, on in the summer of Year 10 and one in January of Year 11.

Mock exams are marked and moderated by the department and students who would benefit from intervention are identified. These students are invited to targeted Booster sessions and their progress is reviewed half-termly.

2019 GCSE Results:

4+ 87.5%
7+ 27.08%
P8 0.68

Health and Social Care
Intent

A large and growing health and social care system both nationally and locally has prompted us to set up a key stage 4 course in this subject. We have a large hospital on our doorstep which is a huge employer in the town. As well as this, as a large town there are a number of health and social care providers ranging from childcare, nursing, midwifery, social work, mental health care and care for the elderly. We wanted to give our girls the opportunity to study a course which specifically prepares them for a possible future role in this very large and varied sector.

The Btec we offer is a vocational route into the sector which may extend into further education at level 3/ A level equivalent. This route is suitable for those that may wish to pursue a career in this sector but do not favour a more heavy emphasis on science within their studies. This course may also be attractive to students that favour portfolio assessment that can be created developmentally rather than solely on a summative and written examination.

Wellbeing is high on our agenda as a school. Lifestyle choices and the impacts of these choices ranks highly on our intentions and reasons for the inclusion of this course into our offering. Girls will study all aspects of wellbeing and lifestyle choices, concerning themselves as well as potential clients/patients.

Content

The course comprises of three components/units/sections. These are as follows:

1. Human Lifespan Development

In this component, students study how people grow and develop over the course of their life, from infancy to old age, this includes physical, intellectual, emotional and social development, and the different factors that may affect them. An individual’s development can be affected by major life events, such as marriage, parenthood or moving house, and students will learn about how people adapt to these changes, as well as the types and sources of support that can help them.

This unit is assessed internally by the completion of a written assessment completed in class time.

2. Health and Social Care Services and Values

This component will give students an understanding of health and social care services and will help them to develop skills in applying care values that are common across the sector (some of which are transferable to other sectors that involve interactions with clients or customers). This component will help students to progress to Level 2 or 3 vocational or academic qualifications.

This unit is assessed internally by the completion of a written assessment completed in class time.

3. Health and Wellbeing

In this component, students look at the factors that can have a positive or negative influence on a person’s health and wellbeing. They will learn to interpret physiological and lifestyle indicators, and what they mean for someone’s state of health. Students will learn how to use this information to design an appropriate plan for improving someone’s health and wellbeing, including short and long-term targets. Additionally, they will explore the difficulties an individual may face when trying to make these changes. Students will develop skills in analysing information and communicating for a specific purpose, which will support their progression to Level 2 or 3 vocational or academic qualifications.

This unit is assessed with an external exam

The full specification can be viewed here:

Health and social care qualifications

Implementation

We have the same time allocation as a GCSE option – 5 hours per fortnight. This is currently allocated as one single and two double one hour lessons on the two week timetable. We are programmed into a room which is furnished with PCs. The content is taught and the ‘assignments’ are completed within this setting. A range of learning and teaching methods are used in order to keep the lessons as fresh and as interesting as possible for the students and to encourage a good quality outcome. Examples of learning and teaching methods employed: Case studies, group work, mind mapping, problem solving, practical application, visits, links to work experience, personal experiences shared, visiting speakers.

We wish to encourage students to be proud of the portfolio work that they complete and therefore take ownership of their learning experience as it develops over the course.
We have set aside some ‘wellbeing’ time for the groups, in order to allow them to competently set a good example and to display and promote wellbeing in future clients/patients.

Impact

This course is new to Davison in 2019-2020. It is hoped that many of the students will progress to FE colleges to continue with their interest in this area. It is hoped that undertaking this course will inspire them to continue and develop their career intentions.

Early indications from the completion of coursework and student voice, indicate that the course has had a successful first term.

History
Intent

The purpose of our KS3 curriculum is to give students a broad (mostly chronological) knowledge and understanding of the significant people, events and developments and their impact on Britain and the world from 1066 to the 21st century. Within this there will be aspects of depth study, storytelling, enquiry and thematic study focusing on change over time.

We aim to develop literacy and inspire a life-long love of History. We want to develop passionate historians and independent learners who seek further knowledge, value education and want to ask questions, think critically about evidence and how the past is constructed and presented. We hope to develop student understanding of the impact and relevance of the past on the world and society today and the ability to make links and connections to other topics and subject areas. We aim to help students develop empathy, their moral compass and a greater understanding of their own choices and responsibilities as members of a community and diverse society.

Our KS3 curriculum also aims to provide a good basis and smooth transition for those who opt at GCSE with a focus on significance, explanation of causes, developments and consequences and evaluation of main factors, as well as the skills of evaluating contemporary sources for usefulness and analysing and comping later interpretations for accuracy.

We want our students to be able to communicate enthusiastically and knowledgably about the past and aim to develop high levels of written and verbal communication, as well as the confidence to argue their points convincingly.

Through exploring the past pupils should be able to critically assess evidence and write well-structured arguments; these vital skills will enable them to succeed as they move through education as well as develop a better understanding of the world they are growing up in.

Content

Year 7 – Power and authority of the Monarch

Term 1 – KPI focus, using evidence and reaching conclusions

  • 1066 and the Norman Conquest
  • Power and protest in Medieval England

Term 2 – KPI focus, usefulness of evidence and narrative account

  • Thomas Beckett and the relationship between Church and Monarchy
  • Peasants Revolt – long term and short term causes, developments and consequences
  • Wars of the Roses

Term 3 – KPI focus, significance and interpretations

  • The Reformation and its impact
  • How should we remember Mary I?
  • Why was Elizabeth I a successful Queen

Year 8 – Rights and Representation

Term1- KPI focus, using evidence and reaching conclusions

  • Why did the English have a revolution and how did that shape England?
  • The controversy of Oliver Cromwell
  • Monarchy Restoration and Glorious Revolution (development of parliament)
  • The making of the United Kingdom

Term 2 – KPI focus, usefulness of evidence and narrative account

  • Revolutions – American, French and Industrial
  • How and why was the Industrial Revolution a time of change and protest?
  • Empire

Term 3 – KPI focus, significance and interpretations

  • Slavery
  • Civil Rights (India, USA, South Africa)
  • Titanic
  • Multicultural Britain

Year 9 – Conflict, warfare and new technology

Term1 – KPI focus, using evidence and reaching conclusions

  • Terror as a form of protest – assassination of JFK, People’s Will and Suffragettes
  • Why did WW1 break out
  • Recruitment, trenches, key battles and new weapons
  • Local History study based on one soldiers experience
  • Conscientious Objectors

Term 2 – KPI focus, usefulness of evidence and narrative account

  • Treaty of Versailles and its long term impact
  • League of Nations
  • Democracy v Dictatorship (case study Italy)
  • America in the 1920s
  • Weimar Germany
  • Nazi Germany

Term 3 – KPI focus, significance and interpretations

  • Why did WW2 break out?
  • Key turning points of WW2
  • Dresden and Hiroshima; can bombing civilians ever be justified?
  • Genocide

Year 10 – AQA GCSE History, paper 2, Britain

Term1 – Elizabethan England

  • Court and Parliament
  • Rebellions and why they failed
  • Why did Elizabeth not marry?
  • Golden Age
  • Wealth and the Gentry
  • Development of Theatre
  • Poverty – causes and solutions
  • Importance of overseas Exploration
  • Religion – settlement, the Catholic and Puritan threat
  • Mary, Queen of Scots
  • The Spanish Armada

Term 2 – Historic Environment and Power and the People

  • Historic Environment study (site changes every year)
  • Magna Carta
  • 2 Baron’s Wars and establishment of parliament
  • Peasants Revolt
  • Pilgrimage of Grace
  • English Revolution
  • Cromwell’s impact
  • American Revolution

Term 3 – Power and the People

  • Peterloo and the Great Reform Act
  • Chartism
  • Anti-Slavery Movement
  • Anti-Corn Law League
  • Factory and social reform
  • Trade Unions – development from Tolpuddle Martyrs to Matchgirls and Dockers Strike into the 20th Century and Labour Party
  • Women’s Suffrage
  • General Strike
  • Miners Strike 1984
  • The Windrush and immigration up to Brixton Riots

 

Year 11 – AQA GCSE History, Paper 1, Wider World
Term1 – Russia

  • Tsardom and why it ended 1896-1917
  • The 1917 Revolutions
  • The failure of the Provisional Government
  • Lenin’s impact
  • Stalin’s Impact
  • The USSR in WW2

Term 2 – Cold War in Asia

  • Cold War roots
  • The Korean War
  • The causes of the Vietnam War
  • Events of the Vietnam War
  • Impact of the Vietnam War

Term 3 – Revision

  • Skills focused revision focusing on higher tariff questions
Implementation

How do we deliver our Intent?

Mixed ability classes. Some SEND students at KS3 are taken out of history for literacy and numeracy intervention.
Year 7: 2 hours per fortnight.
Year 8 and 9: 4 hours a fortnight.
Year 10 and 11: 5 hours a fortnight.

The department plan collaboratively and share resources and good practise regularly in our meetings. We frequently discuss the sequencing of topics and are consistently reflecting and evaluating on the impact of tasks and topics, adding new delivery methods or resources, developing or culling as befitting the students’ needs.

Within lessons a variety of techniques are used to deliver content or skills (see SOW and Course Materials). We aim to strike an effective balance between teacher “story telling”, active or discovery learning, creative and research tasks, debate/discussion and the development and practice of key skills/techniques. We reward effort and enthusiasm of our students through the school reward and ATL system. History lessons often underpin the SMSC values of Davison, particularly social and moral questions. We are continuing to develop retrieval practises to ensure long-term retention of information, particularly at KS4.

The KS3 curriculum offers regular opportunities for deep and critical thinking, challenging questions and forming clear arguments. All lessons include challenge tasks to develop thinking further. We ensure equality of opportunity by making lessons inclusive (this can be through a variety of ways, including use of LSA, storytelling, visual clues, questioning, coloured overlays, explanation of key vocabulary etc.) This allows all learners to make progress through scaffolding or differentiated planning. C. Burgess is the SEND link in the department and she and subject leader have met with Jade Harber to discuss SEND students in History and working in CS.

Homework is set as appropriate at KS3. Homework at KS4 is weekly – focus on building or revising of contextual knowledge, reviewing exam techniques or learning key facts and vocabulary. There is always an extra challenge to encourage independent learning and deepening of contextual understanding. Regular research homework or extra challenge tasks are set from year 7 onwards promoting independent and self-regulating learning. This culminates in a challenging local history project in Year 9 (some of these were exhibited in 2014 to commemorate 100 years since the outbreak of WW1 and were permanently digitalised at Worthing reference library). Outstanding projects are shown to the Head teacher and rewarded in the year 9 celebration assembly.

For our most able readers and passionate historians we have created a wider reading group for each year group at KS3 plus GCSE and email articles from Hindsight magazine once a term to add challenge and develop broader contextual knowledge. As a department we are aware of trying to redress a “cultural capital gap” so also encourage wider reading and watching films and documentaries (fiction and non-fiction) around the topics to develop a love of history and further engagement with topics – this is linked to ATLs. Within history lessons there is exposure to politics, religion and rich vocabulary and we also use art, music and film to enhance teaching and learning. This enables students to see how the past is reflected in and influences wider culture.

Mastery, Assessment and & Frog

At KS3 the 7 key skills (KPIs) are revisited at a more developed and complex level each year. The KPIs have been carefully developed to prepare pupils for the challenges of GCSE questions.

Structured practice of Key Mastery Skills and Feedback/Feed forward

Department have reviewed marking and workload to ensure that marking is manageable, targeted and effective.

Teachers evaluate the needs of their classes and plan accordingly to address skill gaps. Department meetings offer regular opportunities to discuss pupil progress and planning priorities.

KS3: A5 progress books. KPIs are focused each term. Practice in lessons with at least 1 peer and 1 formal assessment. Whole class feedback and DIRT are embedded. KPI boosts periodically throughout the year in and out of lesson time. The progress books are retained throughout KS3 to allow pupils to reflect on their progress.

KS4: A5 progress books. Regular exam technique practice in class, then followed by self, peer and formal assessments (including walking/talking mock style examinations). Whole class feedback and DIRT are embedded.

Throughout KS3 and 4 the department are committed to regularly revisiting key skills. Modelling and exemplars are used regularly to promote pupil understanding of what a higher level answer looks like.

FROG pages have an overview of topics plus video links and some useful activities for remote learning. There are also links to wider reading suggestions. Year 8 has been used as a target year to develop this site.

STAFF: An experienced and passionate team with a minimum of 9 years teaching experience. Staff are committed to regularly attending local CPD sessions, subject network meetings and the PIXL conference each year (appropriate PIXL strategies are then tried and embedded). We also use AQA webinars for post GCSE analysis and delivery of the Historical environment question. 2 members of the department have marked exams for AQA in 2018 and 2019 (Elizabethan England and Conflict in Asia sections) and are therefore able to offer expert assessment training.

TRIPS: We regularly take groups of students to Ypres and we have collaborated with the MFL department on trips to Berlin. We endeavour to take out year 10 students to the site of their Historical Environment location should it be feasible.

How do we know it is being delivered successfully and what happens if we find out we are not?

FROG data capture shows the majority of KS3 achieve most of the KPIs by the end of year 9.
Assessment & feedback : a mix of formative, summative assessment, quizzing and practise of one KPI or exam question.

Whole class feedback. DIRT time.

FROG.

Collaborative planning, moderation and sharing of good practise.

Booster groups at KS4 are identified early and invited to revision sessions. Pupil Premium students are invited and also issued with in-house revision guides.

Intervention – focused at certain times. Year 10 pre mock. Year 11 pre mock Autumn term and pre GCSES. 2 May half term classes.

How are we ambitious for our students?

Rigour in all lessons.

Encourage independent learning – ATL challenges, super challenge tasks for homework, careful planning of tasks to enable students to investigate at greater depth.

Challenging KPIs and topics at KS3 which link to key GCSE skills.

Wider reading encouraged.

Able pupil link – RMA

2 Masterclasses for year 11 Able students approaching the Summer GCSE with a specific focus on attaining a 9.

Impact

What is the progress and achievement like in your subject? Frog /GCSE results.

How do you monitor their progress and how does intervention work? This does not need to be details analyses of grades just a brief summary.

Key Stage 3

In History we focus on 7 key KPIs, the same KPIs are visited in years 7, 8 and 9 with increasing challenge allowing a really strong understanding of the key skills required for excellent historical writing. By focusing on using evidence, research and written explanations we confidently believe pupils will have the writing and evaluative skills necessary for the challenge of GCSE History. Each term there is a focus on 2 KPI’s this allows staff to support pupils to really challenge themselves and develop these skills.

History is a popular subject with high pupil engagement and strong uptake for GCSE study (The most popular option for the last 10 years) showing how pupils are confident in their ability to write about the past. Pupil voice in lesson observations and learning walks is always positive and indicates high levels of pupil enjoyment and an understanding of the relevance of history.

Key Stage 4

2019
4+ 84%
5+ 73%
7+ 40%

The History Department carefully selected the exam board and topic content at Key Stage 3. We consistently achieve exam results above the national average in this academically rigorous subject.

Assessment at Key Stage 4 is based on exam questions and providing formative and summative feedback to help pupils improve. By the exams pupils should be confident in the content of the exams and how to approach exam questions.

History has a high uptake at A Level and Degree (Jo Wood evidence)

Maths
Intent

Achieving your potential in Maths is essential in ensuring that students flourish in the modern world. Our curriculum plan is based on the profile of the intake. This enables us to maximise their enjoyment of Mathematics through an appropriately planned program of study. We follow the National Curriculum and are aware of the needs of all the abilities of our students and have a focus on the needs of the disadvantaged students and the more able ones.

By the time they leave Year 11 we wish them to have a positive outlook regarding their Mathematics experience and be confident and showing independence to have a crack at it.

The whole school’s aim to improve Numeracy outcomes for disadvantaged students involves the department in the LETs curriculum and Numeracy intervention.

Our curriculum objectives are available in the Frog department site, including resources for KPI preparation, post KPI resources for y7-9 and personal learning checklists for Y9-11.

Content

Year 7 – Maths Curriculum and Advanced Maths Curriculum

Y7 Maths Curriculum

Autumn 1:
Key numeracy skills and baseline assessments
Place value and ordering

Autumn 2:
Simplifying and Ordering Fractions
Basic Fraction and Decimal Conversions
Understanding Basic Patterns
Operation with Fractions
Using percentages

Spring 1:
Rounding and Estimating Calculations
Using Formulae
Solving Simple Linear Calculations
Calculating Volume of Cuboids

Spring 2:
Operations with Large or Small numbers
Operations with Decimals
Division
Coordinates and Movement on Coordinate Axes

Summer 1:
Introductions to Ratio and Proportion
Properties of 2D Shapes
Properties of 3D Shapes and Nets
Pie Charts and Line Graphs

Summer 2:
Collecting and Measuring Data
Further Properties of Shapes
Angles in Polygons
Properties of Circles
Unit Conversions
Properties of Angles on a Line and around a Point

Y7 Maths Curriculum Advanced

Autumn 1:
Key numeracy skills and baseline assessments
Place value
Powers and Roots

Autumn 2:
Understanding Percentages
Expressing Quantities as Percentages and Fractions
Rounding and Estimating Calculations
Recognising and Interpreting Numerical Patterns
Operations with Fractions
Percentage Change and Comparing Quantities

Spring 1:
Introduction to Algebra
Solving Simple Linear Equations
Calculating Surface Area of Cuboids
Operations with Very Large and Very Small (Decimal) Numbers

Spring 2:
Continued Operations with Very Large and Very Small (Decimal) Numbers
Introduction to Linear Graphs
Introduction to Ratio
Understanding Geometric Notation
Introduction to Angles in Polygons

Summer 1:
Ordering Positive and Negative Numbers
Introduction to Inequalities
Properties of Special Quadrilaterals
Properties of 3D Shapes
Interpreting and Constructing a Variety of Tables, Charts and Diagrams

Summer 2:
Measures of Average
Conversion of Units and Working with Varied Units
Properties of Angles on Lines and Around Points

Year 8 – Maths Curriculum and Advanced Maths Curriculum

Maths Curriculum

Autumn 1:
Place value
Powers and Roots
Rounding and Estimating Calculations
Expressing Quantities as Percentages and Fractions
Recognising and Interpreting Numerical Patterns

Autumn 2:
Introduction to Linear Graphs
Introduction to Algebra
Operations with Very Large and Very Small (Decimal) Numbers

Spring 1:
Operations with Fractions
Percentage Change and Comparing Quantities
Solving Simple Linear Equations

Spring 2:
Continued Operations with Very Large and Very Small (Decimal) Numbers
Ordering Positive and Negative Numbers
Introduction to Inequalities
Understanding Geometric Notation
Introduction to Angles in Polygons

Summer 1:
Introduction to Ratio
Properties of Special Quadrilaterals
Properties of 3D Shapes

Summer 2:
Interpreting and Constructing a Variety of Tables, Charts and Diagrams
Measures of Average
Conversion of Units and Working with Varied Units
Properties of Angles on Lines and Around Points

Maths Curriculum Advanced

Autumn 1:
Powers and Roots
Working with Formulae
Factors and Primes
Rounding and Standard Form
Terminating Decimals and their Fraction Equivalent

Autumn 2:
Negative Numbers
Introduction to Linear Graphs and Their Equations
Financial Mathematics

Spring 1:
Plans and Elevations
Scale Diagrams and Similar Shapes
Calculating with Fractions and Percentages
Percentage Change
Solving Linear Equations and Inequalities

Spring 2:
Introduction to Probability
Ratio and Proportion
Working with Sequences and Patterns

Summer 1:
Angles in Polygons and on Lines/Around a Point
Area of Common 2D Shapes and Surface Area of Prisms

Summer 2:
Creating and Interpreting Charts and Graphs
Measures of Average
Probability Using Tables and Diagrams

Year 9 – Higher and Foundation tiers

Term 1 both Tiers

  • Angles
  • Factors and Multiple – KPIs C1 and E1 Learner Resources on Frog
  • Basic Number
  • Scale Diagrams and Bearings
  • Basic Algebra
  • Collecting and representing data
  • Basic Fractions
  • Coordinates and Linear Graphs – KPIs C2 and E2 Learner Resources on Frog
  • Basic Decimals
  • Rounding
  • Sequences
  • Financial Maths

Term 2 both Tiers

  • Basic Percentages – – KPIs C3 and E3 Learner Resources on Frog
  • Perimeter and Area – – KPIs C4 and E4 Learner Resources on Frog
  • Real Life Graphs
  • Circumference and Area
  • Equations – – KPIs C5 and E5 Learner Resources on Frog
  • Ratio and Proportion
  • Scatter Graphs – KPIs C6 and E6 Learner Resources on Frog
  • Term 3 both Tiers
  • Indices
  • Pythagoras
  • Standard Form
  • Transformations
  • Introduction to Trigonometry
  • Basic Probability

Year 10 – Foundation tier

Term 1 Foundation

  • Calculating with percentages
  • Measures
  • Statistical Measures
  • 2D Representation of 3D shapes
  • Construction and Loci
  • Properties of Polygons
  • Simultaneous Equations

 

Term 2 Foundation

  • Algebra recap and extension
  • Further Perimeter and Area
  • Review of Basic Probability
  • Graph recap and Extension
  • Congruence and Similarity
  • Further Circumference and Area

Term 3 Foundation

  • Volume
  • Probability

Year 10 – Higher tier

Term 1 Higher

  • Calculating with percentages
  • Measures
  • Statistical Measures
  • 2D Representation of 3D shapes
  • Construction and Loci
  • Properties of Polygons
  • Simultaneous Equations

Term 2 Higher

  • Number Recap and Review
  • Surds
  • Probability
  • Statistics Recap and Review
  • Algebra: Introduction to Quadratics and Rearranging Formulae
  • Congruence and Similarity
  • Volume

 

Term 3 Higher

  • Algebra Recap and Review
  • Sketching Graphs
  • Geometry and Measures recap and Review
  • Linear and Quadratic Equations and their Graphs

Year 11 – Foundation tier

Term 1 Foundation

  • Algebra: Quadratics, Rearranging Formulae and Identities
  • Trigonometry
  • Growth and Decay
  • Inequalities
  • Algebra and Graphs
  • Direct and Inverse Proportion

Term 2 Foundation

  • Sketching Graphs
  • Vectors
  • Solving Quadratic Equations
  • Term 3 Foundation
  • Revision and Preparation for GCSEs

Year 11 – Higher tier

Term 1 Higher

  • Algebra: Further Quadratics, Rearranging Formulae and Identities
  • Trigonometry Recap and Extension
  • Circle Theorems
  • Growth and Decay
  • Equation of a Circle
  • Further Equations and Graphs
  • Vectors
  • Sine and Cosine Rules

 

Term 2 Higher

  • Inequalities
  • Further Sketching Graphs
  • Direct and Inverse Proportion
  • Transforming Functions
  • Numerical Methods
  • Algebraic Fractions

Term 3 Higher

  • Gradient and Rates of Change
  • Pre-Calculus and Area Under a Graph
  • Revision and Preparation for GCSEs
Implementation

Curriculum Delivery:

  • A team of 8 full-time subject specialists with 3 other Senior School Leaders teaching (Head, Deputy, Assistant) a further 30 hours. There is also a part-time RA tutor and full-time NTA(?) providing small group intervention for PP students.
  • Mathematics is allocated 8 hours per fortnight in Year 7 and Y11 and 7 hours for Y8-10.
  • Our Y7/8 SOW is based and adapted on Kangaroo Maths SOW. This incorporates 6 ‘official’ KPIs and 7 ‘unofficial’ ones (homework tasks).
  • We teach from an adapted version of the AQA 3-year program at KS4 (Y9-11) for both tiers.
  • How do we plan/review how we teach- shared area/collaboration dept meetings/ pairing up of sets teachers
  • Resources drawn from —–
  • Informal conversations

Teaching:

Critical thinking and thinking hard:

  • Encourage students to think deeply about the work they are tackling e.g. by applying skills to more open-ended questions, questions in unfamiliar contexts, or in a real-life context.
  • At Key Stage 3 students are taught skills that can be assessed for fluency, reasoning, problem-solving, application and misconceptions and are taught within these aspects.
    Modelling and Explanation:
  • Over the last year the department have adopted some of the principles of Craig Barton’s research book ‘How I wish I had taught Mathematics’. Example Problem Pair Teach pair/silent teacher/stand at the back
    Structured practice of Key Mastery Skills:
  • There are 13 Key Skills attributed to Y7 and Y8 and are taught/assessed within the SOW and assessed within ‘official’ and ‘unofficial’ KPIs.
  • Standardised KPIs set for all Y7/8/9. Resources are available on Frog for students to access prior to the learning of that topic. This includes video links and practice questions to CorbettMaths or MyMaths. It also includes extension resources for all.
  • Keys stage 4 half termly testing –ab/CDE

Feedback/feed forward:

  • After every KPI, half term, termly or end of year assessment students are expected to complete GAR self-analysis sheets, set targets and complete feedback tasks. A whole class feedback (WCF) form is provided as well for students to self-analyse. Use of the PiXL Maths App for inputting scores for any ‘official’ exam papers is made and a selection of feed forward questions are provided in a digital or paper format and support is provided through tutorials.
  • At key stage 4 we have started to give recorded audio feedback of tests as well worked solutions

Challenge for every student:

  • Extension resources are provided on the Frog platform for Y7-9 for all KPI related topics.
  • Use of the worksheets and homework sheets on MyMaths is made for Y7/8 providing extension resources for all students.
  • Further maths course ( we used to do stats)
  • Maths challenges + competitions
    Independence and Self-Regulatory Learners:
  • After every KPI, half term, termly or end of year assessment students are expected to complete GAR self-analysis sheets, set targets and complete feedback tasks. A whole class feedback (WCF) form is provided for students to self-analyse.
  • Extra resources on MyMaths and MethodMaths are provided for any student to complete for extension homework
Impact

We use the Frog platform to track KS3 student progress against KPIs.  Students are assessed as to whether they have met, not met or exceeded each KPI and are provided the opportunity to improve their scores through independent study.  

In 2019 our GCSE results for Maths were significantly above the National Average.  Davison 4+ (81%), NA (60%), NA Girls (59%), Davison 7+ (30%), NA (16%), NA Girls (14%). 

We use results from half termly assessments and KPIs to ensure students are in the correct teaching groups as well as making sure that every student is being appropriately supported or stretched and challenged. 

We have links with our local College where Maths can be studies at a higher level.  Most of our students who study Maths to a higher level attend one of 3 main colleges locally. 

Media Studies
Intent

Media studies is offered as a GCSE option for students in years 10 and 11. In media studies we intend to help students to become discerning consumers of a range of media products, with the ability to recognise the ways in which the media manipulates the consumer. They will also develop practical skills to create realistic media products. By the end of the course, they will have explored a range of set products, have a clear understanding of the media theoretical framework and an ability to apply media theories to texts.

Content

Year 10

Term1

  • Introduction to Media language, Media Audiences, Representation and Media Audiences
  • Set product – Sitcoms – Genre, Narrative, Audiences and Representation

Term 2

  • Film Industries
  • Film Marketing – Mise en Scene, Media Language, Semiotic Codes, Conventions,

Term 3

  • NEA – responding to a brief connecting with generating printed marketing materials for a film within a specified Genre
  • Set product – Radio – Industry, technology and convergence, Radio Audiences

Year 11

Term1

  • Set Product – Print Advertising, Media Language, Semiotics and Codes, Representation in Advertising
    Term 2
  • Set Product – Music, Video and Online Media. Media Language, Representation, Industries and audiences
  • Set Product Magazines and Newspapers – Media Language and Representation, Media Contexts and Industries

Term 3

  • Set Product – Pokemon Go/Fortnite – Video games – Media Industries and Audiences
Implementation

Use Digital Textbooks and exercise books. Make use of a range of multimedia resources and tools.

Critical Thinking and Thinking Hard

  • Encourage students to think deeply about the work they are doing e.g. by reducing, transforming, ranking, categorising and comparing information.
  • Using graphs and maps, to identify trends, use evidence to form arguments, identify anomalies and use mathematical and statistical skills to inform ideas.
  • Give students opportunities to be critical about the typically western worldview, critique resurces and understand what makes reliable data e.g. sample size.

 

Modelling and Explanation

  • Using physical modelling where appropriate e.g. actions, practical demonstrations
  • Model in the moment by demonstrating constructing a piece of writing or answer live in front the class.
  • Use students’ examples as model answers to show effective work.
  • Use examples of work to unpick what might need to be improved.
  • Exemplar work for KS3 against each KPI can be found on Frog

 

Structured Practice of Key Mastery Skills

  • Key geographical skills e.g. map, graph, fieldwork, numeracy and GIS skills to be practised regularly across the Key stages
  • KS3 Assessments which are similar in style and language to GCSE assessments
  • Encourage focused practice that replicates exam conditions
  • Regular quizzing e.g. using AfL techniques such as mini whiteboards to inter-leave topics
  • Dual coding of key terms to promote recall

 

Feedback / Feedforward

  • Employ a range of verbal / written feedback strategies with targeted areas for development.
  • Allow students opportunities to respond to feedback, whether immediately through feedback response time, or later by linking similar tasks and topics.

 

Challenge for Every Student

  • Ensure students are deep-thinking rather than task busy
  • Give space for students to discuss and ask geographical questions
  • Have a dedicated resource bank of challenge tasks and questions for students to use

 

Independence and Self-regulated learners

  • Give students opportunities for learning independently through group work and presentations at least one per year.
  • Give students regular fieldwork opportunities, both on and off the school grounds.
  • Use differentiated homework tasks to promote independence outside the classroom.
  • Challenge tasks are embedded into planning, with tasks on slides
Impact

What is the progress and achievement like in your subject?

Motivation levels are high in Media Studies. Learner engagement in lessons fosters a level of interest that results in a higher than average uptake of students following Level 3 Media related courses. Recent results have been above the national average for all key measures at 4+, 5+ and 7+. Levels of progress as measured by progress 8 are above national average for the subject

Modern Foreign Languages
Intent

The purpose of our KS3 curriculum is to give students access to a broad and in-depth knowledge of vocabulary, grammar and phonics via a communicative approach to teaching and learning, using Listening and Reading as Modelling.

We also aim to motivate our students to enjoy their learning of a language through the use of Content and Language Integrated Learning (C.L.I.L), so that they have the most favourable attitudes to the language, to users of the language, and to their chance of success in learning the language.

Through these two combined approaches, we intend to develop all 4 skill areas as well as intercultural understanding and language learning skills in order to promote self-efficacy and support learners to develop their character – including their resilience, confidence and independence.

Content

Year 7

Term 1

Students start their language journey by learning about the importance of learning and how to learn a Modern Foreign Language for the first 5 weeks: ‘Let’s learn a language!’ Project.

VOCABULARY

  • Saying your name and learning numbers
  • Giving dates in French
  • Talking about brothers, sisters and age
  • Talking about likes and dislikes

GRAMMAR

  • Using the verb avoir
  • Gender of nouns
  • Using the indefinite article: un, une
  • Using the grave accent
  • Using the singular forms of avoir
  • Using il y a to mean ‘there is’ or ‘there are’
  • Indefinite and definite articles (singular and plural)
  • Using the verb aimer + the definite article
  • Using aimer in negative sentence

PHONICS

  • Learning to pronounce key French sounds
  • Predicting the pronunciation of unfamiliar words / Pronunciation of nasal sounds
  • Recapping letters of the alphabet sounds, including accented letters
  • Pronunciation of silent ‘s’ on the end of words
  • Pronunciation of qu
  • Using intonation when asking questions

C.L.I.L

  • Learning days and months through a French poem taught to French children
  • Christmas in France

Term 2

VOCABULARY

  • Describing yourself and others
  • Saying what you do
  • Understanding infinitives and regular –er verbs
  • Talking about colours
  • Telling the time
  • Saying what you think of your school subjects and why
  • Talking about likes and dislikes using –er verbs

GRAMMAR

  • Using connectives (et, mais, aussi) and word order with aussi
  • Adjectival agreements
  • Using the singular forms of être / Using être in negative sentences
  • Using possessive adjectives: mon, ma, mes
  • Using a range of verbs to express opinions: aimer, adorer, détester / Using ne … pas with aimer
  • Using parce que to give reasons for your opinions
  • Using et, mais and parce que to join sentences
  • Using qualifiers to give more detailed opinions (très, vraiment, trop)
  • Using adjectives after nouns
  • Conjugation of –er verbs
  • Working back to the infinitives (from the je or on form) with a list of nine verbs

PHONICS

  • Pronouncing key sounds: qu, r, é, an, on, in
  • Pronunciation of i, au, eu, oi, on, an, en
  • Pronunciation of silent ‘h’ in heures and silent ‘s’ at the end of words
  • Pronunciation of masculine and feminine forms of adjectives
  • Pronunciation of silent ‘s’ at the end of words, e.g. noir / noirs

C.L.I.L

  • French artist – George Seurat
  • La Chandeleur (French Pancake Day!)
  • Easter in France

Year 3

VOCABULARY

  • Talking about what you wear to school
  • Talking about your school day
  • Learning about a typical French school
  • Saying what there is / isn’t, using il y a … and il n’y a pas de … Agreeing and disagreeing

GRAMMAR

  • Questions: Qu’est-ce que tu …? / Tu … à quelle heure?
  • Using words in a question to help you start your answer
  • Using sequencers: d’abord, ensuite, puis, après
  • Using Il y a … and Il n’y a pas de / d’ …
  • Agreeing and disagreeing in French (Je suis d’accord, etc.)

PHONICS

  • cognates which sound different due to French pronunciation

C.L.I.L

  • Coco Chanel: a French designer

Year 10

Term 1

Themes of the AQA specification: Theme 2: Local, national, international and global areas of interest.

  • Places in town
  • Directions
  • Prepositions
  • Describing where you live
  • What can you do in your area
  • Using adjectives to describe where you live
  • Comparatives and superlatives
  • Describing your region
  • What did you do last weekend
  • Describing your town in the past
  • Pros and cons of where you live
  • What you would like to do in your area
  • Asking for information about an area
  • Weather and plans
  • Describing your house
  • Ideal house
  • Where you would like to live
  • What you do to help at home
  • What you did to help at home

Term 2

Themes of the AQA specification: Theme 2 : Local, national, international and global areas of interest; Theme 1: Identity and culture.

  • What you do on holiday
  • What you can do on holiday (on peut…)
  • Holiday preferences
  • Understanding and using 2-3 tenses (past, present and future) together
  • Describing a past holiday
  • Future holiday plans
  • Holiday accommodation
  • Dream holidays
  • Hotel reviews
  • Booking a hotel room
  • Restaurant dialogues and ordering food
  • Restaurant reviews
  • Preferred modes of transport
  • Buying travel tickets
  • Buying souvenirs
  • Holiday disasters

Term 3

Themes of the AQA specification: Theme 3: Current and future study and employment; Theme 2: Local, national, international and global areas of interest.

  • To revise and extend vocabulary for school subjects
  • Opinions about school subjects
  • Describe your school day
  • To understand how to use reflexive verbs
  • Daily routine
  • What you did yesterday at school
  • To understand descriptions of schools
  • School uniform
  • To understand comparisons of the French and English school systems
  • School rules
  • What you did at primary school
  • Extra-curricular activities
  • School exchanges
  • Advice about healthy living
  • Your lifestyle in past and future
  • Opinion about fast food

Year 11

Term1

Themes of the AQA specification: Theme 3: Current and future study and employment; Theme 1: Identity and culture.

  • Types of jobs
  • To say what is important to you in a job
  • Part-time jobs
  • Work experience
  • Future plans
  • Pros & cons of going to university
  • Ideal plans
  • Job adverts & applications
  • Benefits of speaking another language

Term 2

Themes of the AQA specification: Theme 2: Local, national, international and global areas of interest.

  • What issues are important to you
  • Causes of poverty & possible solutions
  • Environmental problems
  • What you do to help the environment
  • Ethical shopping
  • Voluntary work
  • Big events and their impact

Term 3

Revision

  • Skills focused revision questions

 

Implementation

Implementation:

Our French classes are taught as follows: 

Year 7: 3 hours per fortnight, in sets from A-C, following the Maths sets.  

Year 8 and 9: 5 hours a fortnight, in mixed A-C sets. 

Year 10 and 11: 5 hours a fortnight in mixed ability sets. Students who are in sets A or B for Maths have to continue with their learning of French into KS4. 

Our Spanish classes are taught as follows: 

Year 7: 3 hours per fortnight, in sets from A-E, following the Maths sets. At the end of Year 7, students in Maths sets E have the option of choosing LETS instead of studying a language. 

Year 8 and 9: 5 hours a fortnight, in mixed A-E sets.  

Year 10 and 11: 5 hours a fortnight in mixed ability sets. Students who are in sets A or B for Maths have to continue with their learning of Spanish into KS4. 

In Year 7, there is a small number of students who have a Special Educational Need, who do not study a language and are educated in Curriculum Support for extra literacy and numeracy. 

Additionally, at KS4, there is a number of girls who do not have to study a language at GCSE level because they are in a set C or below in Maths, but still choose to opt for a language. This is something that we would like to improve on and we have identified as a target in our 2019-2020 Departmental Improvement Plan, so that we are more in line with the uptake in the national average. 

The department plans collaboratively, shares resources and good practice on Course Materials and in Departmental meetings.  Since May 2019, the department has reviewed the Schemes of Work at KS3 in order to include sequences of lessons, which reflect our shared belief in both the ‘Communicative’ and ‘C.L.I.L’ approaches via our Mid-Term Plans.  

We aim to develop the confidence of our linguists by planning and teaching a wide range of differentiated activities, which promote the use of Target Language between students to teachers; students to students and the use of spontaneous speaking; ensuring challenge for all.   

Critical Thinking and Thinking Hard 

  • To offer opportunities for our students to understand and respond to spoken and written language from a variety of authentic sources. 
  • To plan for and deliver activities which allow our students to speak with increasing confidence, fluency and spontaneity, finding ways of communicating what they want to say, including through discussion and debates, asking questions, and continually improving the accuracy of their pronunciation and intonation. 

Modelling and Explanation 

  • Listening as modelling the speaking, has been a recent focus and is now at the core of what we deliver to our students, through the use of Target Language and ‘Flooding the input’ approach to embed new key-phrases and grammatical structures in chunks, to avoid cognitive overload and promote more accurate output from students at the production stage. 
  • Reading as modelling the writing, is also a key factor in helping our learners to develop their writing skills through comprehensible input. To this end, there are substantial quantities of interesting comprehensible receptive activity in both listening and reading. 
  • Exemplar work for Key Stage 3 against each Key Performance Indicators can be found on the Frog platform. 
  • AQA GCSE model written answers in the Examiner Reports are used in class and success criteria are shared to show what success looks like at KS4. 

Structured Practice of Key Mastery Skills 

  • Listening, speaking, reading and writing skills are practised in every lesson at both key stages. At Key Stage 3 the four skills are linked to our MFL Key Performance Indicators, which are challenging in the fact that they mirror key skills at GCSE and at Key Stage 4, these relate to the AQA exam skills. 
  • Opportunities in every lesson to show evidence of Key Performance Indicators in order to show progress via AFL techniques, peer and self-assessment. 

Feedback / Feedforward 

  • Mix of oral and written feedback are given regularly and students are encouraged to respond to the feedback by reflecting on their strengths and areas of development, through planned activities to iron out misconceptions of certain concepts or accuracy of key-vocabulary. 
  • Students receive helpful feedback, which allows them to improve the quality and the accuracy of their language use, either immediately or in the near future via different topics. 

Challenge for Every Student 

  • Depth of processing: we believe that learners should process the items to be learned as deeply and as broadly as possible. 
  • Use of a variety of differentiated techniques in every lesson to ensure that all students are suitably challenged whilst no one is left feeling stuck. Challenge tasks are embedded into planning, with tasks on slides. 
  • Use of ‘Super Challenge Tasks’ linked to the four skills, vocabulary and grammar strands on walls in every classroom. 
  • Extended activities for native or near-native speakers are used to ensure that students continue to practise their language at the right level. 
  • Wider reading encouraged: subscription to Mary Glasgow magazines, which are available to borrow during the ‘Language Club’ or as an extension in lessons. 

Independence and Self-regulated learners 

  • Students are encouraged to work independently by being explicitly taught how to develop their receptive skills; for example, dictionary skills, reading and listening strategies lessons are delivered regularly. As far as the production skills are concerned, we have been creating and using sentence builders and speaking mats. 
  • Students are expected to develop their memory skills by learning how to memorise key-vocabulary and grammatical concepts, challenging themselves to speak and write from memory, as they develop their confidence in the target language.   
  • Learning homework is set regularly on Quizlet and retrieval practice is used to recall vocabulary or grammar points taught over the course of the year or the Key Stage. 
  • We encourage students to take the learning of the target language outside the classroom by engaging with hobbies they enjoy in their first language; cooking, reading, films, songs etc.… but in the Target Language. 
Impact

In KS3, we use the Mastery Learning, where progress is monitored using the Frog platform. From Year 7 to Year 9, students work on the same 13 KPIs, progressing from Foundation (Y7) to Secure (Y8) and finally to Confident (Y9). Our most able students can achieve Excelling by the end of Y9.  In every lesson, students have the opportunity to collect evidence of different KPIs, which they record on their personal login sheets. These KPIs are also assessed regularly in lessons in their green assessment books, and recorded on Frog at least termly. We make use of KPI Boost time at key points during the year, after the termly capture data in order to help students who are under-performing to have a chance to catch up but also for our most able students to deepen their learning by using the Extended Learner Resources.  

In KS4, students’ progress is monitored through half-termly assessment in Y10 and using two sets of Mock Examinations, based on AQA past papers; one in June of Year 10 and one in January of Year 11. The students are entered at either Foundation or Higher in the 4 skills area, which help us to make the right decision for their GCSE exam entries. 

Mock exams are marked according to the AQA marking schemes, by the department and students who would benefit from intervention are identified if they are working 1 grade below their Moderate Learning Grade. These students are invited to targeted Booster sessions and their progress is reviewed half-termly.  We offer a differentiated Booster programme, either at Foundation or Higher level to ensure that our most able students are also challenged to achieve Grade 7+. 

At both KS3 and KS4, Pupil Premium students are identified and monitored to ensure that their progress is in line with the rest of their cohort and that they have access to resources that other students would have. 

2019 MFL GCSE Results: 

 FRENCH FRENCH NATIONAL AVERAGEGERMAN GERMAN NATIONAL AVERAGESPANISH SPANISH NATIONAL
AVERAGE 
 
4+ 79.6% 69.4% 90% 75.3% 80% 69.7%  
5+ 59% 53.2% 60% 57.1% 52% 54.6%  
7+ 26.5%   22.9% 50% 22.9% 16% 25.7%  
9 10.2% 4.5 20% 4.8% 6% 5.7%  

Since 2019, the uptake for French A’ Level has remained the same but the uptake for Spanish A’ Level has quintupled, which is very encouraging and something that we would like to build on and transfer to French. 

Music
Intent

Sum up the way the curriculum is connected across the years and from primary phase and onto post 16

At Davison we believe that Music is an integral part of the human condition and is essential to the well-rounded education of all children. Not only is it intellectually satisfying but as an art form it engenders concentration, teamwork, individual confidence and self-discipline.

The aim of the music department is to provide all students with a wide range of practical music making experiences in both curricular and extra-curricular activities. All girls are encouraged regardless of their ability and there are many opportunities available for involvement both in and out of the classroom. We provide a positive, inclusive environment where girls can develop their imagination, self-esteem and teamwork skills.

Through collaborative practical work, the study of music helps to develop lifelong skills such as the ability to:

  • Work as part of a team to meet a high pressure deadline
  • Have confidence to push your own thoughts forward but be sensitive to others’ opinions
  • Listen and respond to new information whilst under pressure
  • Work hard to meet the deadline even though you’re tired or sick
  • Think on your feet
  • Learn new things quickly which you then have to present confidently
  • Come up with an original idea and take it all the way to completion
  • Persuade people to think or feel a certain way through your presentation or performance
  • Delegate roles to other people in your team, taking into account their strengths and weaknesses
  • Stand in front of people you don’t know and present your work to them confidently
  • Focus entirely on the task in hand regardless of distraction
  • Rework an idea at the last minute to adapt to a change in the team
Content

Key Stage 3 Music

In years 7, 8 and 9 students have 2 hours of classroom music lessons per fortnight. The curriculum has been created to ensure that students perform, listen to, review and evaluate music across a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions.

They will learn to sing and to use their voices, to create and compose music on their own and with others, use technology appropriately and have the opportunity to progress to the next level of musical excellence.

They will understand and explore how music is created, produced and communicated using the musical elements of pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure and appropriate musical notations.

Students are expected to meet the KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) for performing (including singing) composing (including improvising) and critical evaluation (including target setting, contextualising and assessing)

Year 7 – Elements of Music

Term1

  • Graphic score and other notations
  • Recorders and stave notation
  • Core skills of group work and feedback
  • Using voices as instruments

Term 2

  • Musical theatre
  • Performance skills
  • Developing group work skills and sharing ideas

Term 3

  • Reggae
  • Developing independence in ensemble playing
  • Instruments of the Orchestra

Year 8 – Rhythms and Pulses

Term1

  • Jazz, blues and Swing
  • Improvisation and chord patterns
  • Form and structure

Term 2

  • Music from Brazil
  • Music from china
  • Music from Sub-Saharan Africa

Term 3

  • Riffs and hooks
  • Chords patterns and melody writing

Year 9 – Timbres and Textures

Term1

  • Dance Music
  • Exploring Garageband

Term 2

  • Musical Futures
  • Developing Ensemble work

Term 3

  • Chair drumming and cups
  • Boomwhackers
  • Junk Percussion
  • GCSE Music

At Davison we follow the OCR GCSE Music specification. The course consists of 60% Controlled Assessment and 40% examination. Uptake at GCSE is high, despite national trends to the contrary. We currently have 4 GCSE Music groups: 2 in year 10 and 2 in year 11.

Year 10
Term1

  • Elements of Music
  • Key Listening skills
  • Conventions of Pop: Rock n Roll
  • Conventions of Pop: Rock Anthems
  • Songwriting
  • Performance skills and confidence building

Term 2

  • Conventions of pop: Pop Ballads
  • Conventions of Pop: Solo Artists
  • Rhythms of the World: Music of the Americas
  • Rhythms of the World: African Drumming
  • Rhythms of the World: Indian Raga
  • Rhythms of the World: Bhangra
  • Ensemble skills
  • Responding to feedback

Term 3

  • Rhythms of the World: Music of the Middle East
  • Instruments of the Orchestra
  • Form, structure, texture and timbre in Orchestral Music
  • Revision for year 10 exam

Year 11
Term1

  • The Concerto Through Time: The Baroque Solo Concerto
  • The Concerto Through Time: The Baroque Concerto Grosso
  • The Concerto Through Time: The Classical Concerto
  • The Concerto Through Time: The Romantic Concerto
  • Revision for Mock exam
  • Exam board set composition
  • Solo and ensemble performances

Term 2

  • Film Music
  • Completing recordings
  • Revision

Term 3

  • Revision
Implementation

Curriculum Delivery
Music is taught by 3 subject specialists. Music is allocated 2 hours per fortnight at KS3 and 5 hours of curriculum time per fortnight at KS4. Students are taught to develop their skills and confidence through regular performance and group work and composing tasks. Students also listen to music from different cultures, times and places and identifying key features and making links.

Teaching
Critical thinking and thinking hard

Students are required to learn key threshold concepts related to performing, composing and analysing. They are required to recall facts and be able to recognise and apply them to their own and others’ work.

During written tasks students are expected to use key vocabulary when answering questions. This is displayed for KS3 on the word wall and GCSE students are expected to learn 10 words per week (which they are tested on weekly) which should be incorporated into written answers

Structured practice of key mastery skills

Throughout the course students will practice and develop key performing, composing, listening and evaluating skills. These will be repeated and refined on an individual basis depending on the students’ level of experience to ensure all students have the necessary skills to perform with confidence and listen to music with understanding.

At GCSE, written work is woven throughout the course with structured examination and question practice repeated and applied to music from our different Areas of Study. Students will develop skills of detailed description using key words, of which 10 and given every week and tested the following lesson. They will analyse key features of the Areas of Study and be able to make clear links between them.

Feedback/Feed Forward

Feedback in music is continual and ongoing. During practical tasks students are given immediate verbal feedback:

Students self-assess using recordings on Frog and develop their skills in peer assessment based upon key assessment criteria.

At KS4, pieces are recorded and detailed written feedback is given for each one, to each student, every half term.

At the end of each topic students sit a mock written paper which is marked and discussed together in class, to identify common errors and areas of success. This is used to inform future planning for that group or set of individuals.

Challenge for every student

Tasks at KS3 are very differentiated by both task and by outcome. Due to the many opportunities for extra-curricular involvement, all students can find a club to stretch them musically. Music GCSE is fully inclusive at Davison. Girls do not need to have had private lessons or be able to read music in order to take the GCSE. The GCSE Music specification is a challenging course for all students due to the range of topics and styles covered. Even for our most advanced students, studying work in a variety of styles and conventions often pushes them outside their comfort zone and encourages exploration of musical forms and devices not experienced before.

Support and structured feedback enables students with less experience to achieve well and also aim for the highest grades. Many girls who have never had instrumental or singing lessons gain grades well above the national average.

Differentiation is embodied in every lesson to enable to students to access the curriculum at their own level whilst providing the stretch and challenge required for them to meet and exceed target grades.

Independence and Self-Regulating Learners.

This concept is vital for the success of all students in Music. Musicians need to be self-motivated, independent learners who are able to apply skills learned even when working in small groups or individually away from the teacher

During KS3 we build these skills through structured tasks that are broken down and layered, with clear expected outcomes and behaviour guidelines for times spent working without a teacher. At KS4 students are required to extend upon these tasks for homework and have work prepared to show to the teacher in their next lesson. As work is often performed to others (even work in progress), students need to ensure that they have reached the expected point in the task in the set timescale.

Teacher guidance is provided when embarking on any new task but at KS4 there is a large element of personal choice when selecting material to perform.

Homework is set every lesson in KS4 (3 times per fortnight).

Assessment

Formative assessment is ongoing throughout the course. Explained above.

All Controlled Assessment formal summative assessments must happen in year 11, although mock recordings have been completed at the end of year 10 in preparation for this.

Extra-Curricular Programme and Opportunities

The Music department is involved in marketing the school at events such as Open Evening, AGAT Musical Theatre year 5 Day, performances at feeder school assemblies and taster days. Davison are frequently invited to take part in Community Charity musical events such as singing at the switching on the Worthing Christmas lights, singing at the Rotary Christmas Tree in the town centre and performing at local care homes. We take part in the annual “Worthing Sings Live” concert organised by West Sussex Music for year 7 singers from Worthing secondary schools. In addition to this, we put on many events throughout the school year here at Davison involving hundreds of girls. These include the annual Winter concert, Spring Concert, Interform Musical Theatre events and GCSE concert, in addition to many smaller chamber music concerts and an annual school musical.

We offer instrumental lessons to a wide range of students through West Sussex Music and a team of private teachers. We have two choirs, a String Ensemble, Woodwind Ensemble, Swing Band, Saxophone Quartet, Recorder group, Live Lounge Club, Worship Band, Grade 5 Theory club and Ukulele Group. In addition to this, students rehearse themselves in smaller chamber music groups and perform in assemblies.

Impact

In KS3 Progress is monitored using Frog. In KS3 students work towards 5 KPIs. These are assessed regularly in lessons, moderated at least termly in department meetings, and recorded on Frog at least termly. Work is recorded regularly and teacher feedback is also recorded after every performance and uploaded to Frog.

In KS4, students are monitored using mixed exam questions, which take place in lessons approximately half-termly, and using two sets of Mock exams, on in the summer of Year 10 and one in January of Year 11.

Mock exams are marked and moderated by the department and students who would benefit from intervention are identified. These students are invited to targeted Booster sessions and their progress is reviewed half-termly.

Student progress is monitored closely throughout the course. Recorded work is marked/assessed, feedback given, students then respond and make improvements. This practice is regular and embedded.

GCSE Music outcomes at Davison are consistently higher than the national average.

Personal Development
Impact

What is the progress and achievement like in your subject? Frog /GCSE results.

How do you monitor their progress and how does intervention work? This does not need to be details analyses of grades just a brief summary.

Physical Education (PE)
Intent

Sum up the way the curriculum is connected across the years and from primary phase and onto post 16

Our curriculum aims to develop and instill a lifelong involvement in fitness and health living, combined with a passion for sport and physical activity that promotes a culture of teamwork, sportsmanship and respect for all.

We aim to break down barriers in participation by providing a safe and enjoyable environment for students to be free to improve their physical literacy in all activity areas regardless of ability. We teach a broad curriculum across KS3 allowing students to experience a range of creative, fitness based and team sports in increasing depth. In KS4 students choose pathways to follow depending on their sporting preferences. By offering this curriculum model we hope to establish and promote a lifelong independent involvement in physical activity and ensure pupils leave us with the tools and knowledge to stay fit for life.

In KS4 we also deliver examinations in GCSE PE (AQA) and BTEC Sport (EDEXCEL). Students can opt for these courses in addition to their core PE lessons. By offering 2 examination courses we hope to cover a wider range of learning styles for our students and elevate individual achievement.

We also offer an extensive extra-curricular program across the year with clubs ranging from squad training sessions to recreational games, aesthetic and fitness activities.

Implementation

Curriculum Delivery

Core PE is taught by 6 PE specialist teachers. In Year 7 they are allocated 5 hours per fortnight, Year 8 & 9 have 4 hours per fortnight and Year 10 & 11 have 3 hours. Students are taught in mixed ability classes for all practical activities. Year 10 and 11 can choose option pathways each year which allows them to take part in different activity areas where they have particular interest.

The PE department plan collaboratively and share resources and good practice on a regular basis.

Examination classes have an additional 5 hours of teaching time per fortnight and are also taught by subject specialists. Students are taught both theory and practical elements of the course together and will spend one lesson a fortnight in a classroom-based lesson.

Examination classes are also taught in mixed ability groups.

Teaching

Critical thinking and thinking hard

Students are required to take part in a wide range of different activities throughout KS3 with most activities being taught progressively throughout the years. Students are challenged to look at links between different activities such as invasion games or aesthetics to look for common principles and apply these in their practical performance and theoretical understanding. Students are given the opportunity to analyse their own and others’ performances to identify strengths and weaknesses and give suggestions for improved success.

In GCSE PE and BTEC Sport pupils are required to learn key terminology and concepts, recall and apply this information to sporting situations. They also need to be able to use given data, show an understanding of what it is showing before applying it using graphs and tables. Students are given the opportunity to think deeply about the topics they are covering, discuss in group and form opinions, describing in detail their reasoning. Pupils also need to be able to analyse syllabus topic areas and provide positive and negative responses when questioned.

Modelling and explanation

We use physical modelling in all lessons combined with verbal instruction to ensure all learners can access and replicate demonstrations in lessons. Both students and teachers are used to show examples of good practice and show required tasks in lessons. Video footage is regularly used in lessons. For example: in dance to show professional works which may act as a stimulus for the lesson or unit content. This is also appropriate in other activities to demonstrate high level game play with a focus on understanding of positions, rules and use of skills. We also use video footage taken in lessons to show effective work and highlight strengths and areas for improvement to the class or individual. Exemplar work for KS3 can be found in the learning locker on FROG for each KPI.

Furthermore, in GCSE PE and BTEC Sport model answers are also used for examination questions along with the use of mark schemes to help pupils understand how an exam question is marked. Writing frames are also used to break down longer answer questions to ensure pupils understand how to structure their answers successfully to gain maximum marks. Practical sports are covered in great technical depth and are demonstrated and modelled by teachers in the moment for accurate replication. Practical activities are chosen by looking at the strengths of the class and past experiences to maximise marks awarded.

Structured practice of key mastery skills

In KS3 core PE lessons students are taught key skills linking to our assessed KPI’s. Our KPI’s remain the same throughout KS3 but through a slight change in wording require students to increase the depth and breadth of their knowledge in key practical and theoretical areas of study. These skills are covered in a range of different activity areas to allow pupils every opportunity for success. Throughout each year they are assessed on ability to: show and increasing understanding of rules; creatively experiment with different skills; select and apply skills effectively in a competitive situation; evaluate performance giving feedback for improved success and develop communication and leadership skills. These are all very important skills in PE which, should they go on to study one of our examination courses will give pupils a good grounding for successfully accessing the syllabus content.

In GCSE PE and BTEC Sport aspects of the required theory content is taught through practical scenarios. By allowing students to physically experience key ideas for themselves such as training principles, they are able to show a better understanding and knowledge in their written responses whilst retaining information in more detail. Regular focused exam question practise is also used to check recall of key terms and topics.

Feedback/ feed forward

Feedback in all PE lessons is continual and ongoing. Due to the practical nature of our subject we can give instant feedback to students who have either successfully completed an activity or who require further guidance. Feedback is either verbal, visual or through manual guidance where appropriate and can either come from their peers or teaching staff. Students are also able to use video footage to gain feedback and further improve future performances. Students are given time in lessons to respond to feedback and further develop their skill level.

In GCSE PE and BTEC Sport lessons, again feedback is given regularly and immediately in response to practical performance. Students are encouraged to evaluate each other’s work and performance and get used to providing constructive and useful guidance for improvement. Written marking and feedback are given for formal mock papers and targeted areas for development given to individuals. If required students are selected for targeted intervention sessions to help the further improve their knowledge.

Challenge for every student

Our curriculum is designed so all students can access the unit content but work at a level that challenges them to achieve at the highest level. Students are encouraged to complete extension activities and explore different areas of physical literacy that may take them out of their comfort zone. Different aspects of examination content is embedded throughout KS3 units of work to challenge students early on and encourage them to ‘think hard’. PE lessons provide differentiated options to allow learners of all ability to succeed and challenge themselves.

In GCSE PE and BTEC Sport pupils of all abilities are support in their learning and encouraged to independently seek challenge in order to help meet and exceed target grades. Extra-curricular provision is given for students who require extra assistance as well as those who are aiming towards the highest grades. With regular support, guidance and exemplar answers when needed students can gain the confidence to push themselves to improve their practical performance and knowledge application over the duration of the course.

Independence and self-regulating learners

In core PE lessons students are encouraged to work independently every lesson. Due to the nature of the subject opportunity to take on leadership roles and develop communication skills are evident all the time. Students are actively encouraged to think for themselves, solve problems and be creative across a wide range of different activities and scenarios. Each unit of work in KS3 has a differentiated piece of homework to encourage independent learning outside of the classroom. In lessons pupils are often given time to practice a performance or skill or to create a piece of work. They need to use practice time wisely in order to be ready for game play or performance. Working with others also challenges time management and opportunity to lead others and motivate them to succeed. In KS4 lessons, pupils can choose which activities pathway they want to follow. Allowing this independent choice encourages students to work harder and take ownership of their physical education.
In GCSE PE and BTEC Sport pupils need to be good independent learners to succeed. Whilst all syllabus content is given it is up to individual students to keep up to date with their learning and engage fully in lessons. Opportunity to ask questions, broaden knowledge and seek to further learning outside of the classroom is encouraged. During lesson time pupils are required to take ownership of practice time in practical lessons to ensure set tasks and skills have been completed and that they can replicate and demonstrate these to the highest level. Often homework tasks set form the basis of the following lesson and required pupils to complete work to ensure they are prepared and up to speed.

Assessment

KS3 Core PE – Formative assessment is ongoing through all KS3 core PE lessons. Summative assessment at the end of each half term and practical unit where students will be assessed against our key performance indicators (KPI’s). Each activity focuses on 2 different KPI’s with each KPI’s being covered in at least 2 different activity areas.

KS4 Core PE – There is no formal assessment in KS4 core PE lessons with a focus on maintaining participation and recreation. However, attitude to learning grades are given termly to monitor positive involvement in lessons.

GCSE PE – Formative assessment is ongoing throughout the course. Summative assessment on practical and coursework-based marks is dependent on when each activity is completed throughout the 2-year course. Mock exam papers will be completed regularly throughout the course with 2 final 1 hour 15 min exams in the Summer of year 11.

BTEC Sport – Formative assessment is ongoing throughout the course. Summative assessment will take place at the end of each unit. Students will take their external exam in January of year 10 with 1 resit available.

Extra-curricular programme and opportunities

All students in years 7,8,9,10, and 11 have the opportunity to participate in a vast range of extra-curricular activities. These change each half term allowing us to provide a wide variety of different clubs with a view to all being inclusive to all regardless of ability and interest. Our sporting squads practice weekly and participate in local, county, regional and national competitions throughout the year. We also run many recreational sports and fitness clubs to encourage participation at all ability levels.

We run a variety of different inter form sports competitions throughout the year. Through these competitions we aim to get as many students participating as possible. Some these events include; dance, bench ball, cross country, sports day, tug of war.

We also run a yearly fund raiser for equipment and facilities in PE. The Davison PE Colour Run has been a huge success over the past few years with over 1000 pupils participating, raising £9000 to date.

We also work closely with our local partnership to host and provide young leaders for a range of events throughout the year. Our KS3 PE leaders programme helps develop our nominated students’ leadership and communications skills to enable them to confidently help run athletics, gymnastics, multi skills and netball events for younger students from Yr1-6.

There are a number of trips offered in PE including several leadership days at local universities and the biannual ski trip to Europe.

GCSE PE and BTEC Sport student are also provided a variety of different support and intervention sessions, as well as opportunities to develop practical sports when required.

Impact

What is the progress and achievement like in your subject? Frog /GCSE results.
How do you monitor their progress and how does intervention work? This does not need to be details analyses of grades just a brief summary.

In KS3 our KPI’s focus on the same key skills across year 7, 8 and 9 but with increasing challenge to improve depth and confidence of knowledge, understanding and performance. By assessing in this way and teaching across the activity areas that we do, we hope to prepare our students effectively for PE examinations courses. Each activity area focuses on 2 different KPI’s. Each KPI’s is covered at least twice per year group allowing students every opportunity to either achieve or exceed each one. Our KPI’s are assessed and inputted every half term at the end of each unit of work. Students who are underperforming are encouraged to boost their achievements and attend extra-curricular clubs, which are linked to specific KPI’s. Our extra-curricular numbers across the academic year are excellent and in all core PE lessons participation and effort levels are high.

PE is a subject with a history of great result over the years in both GCSE PE and BTEC sport course, keeping consistently above national averages. We pride ourselves in being able to offer both courses to give our students a choice of learning pathways tailored to individual learning styles, with a view for getting the highest achievable results. Mock exams set in the summer of year 10 and January of year 11. These are marked and moderated in the department and students who would benefit from targeted booster sessions are identified and individually invited to attend.

Results 2019
GCSE PE
7+ – 40%
5+ – 87%
4+ – 100%

BTEC Sport
D*-D – 13%
D*-P – 100%

We have a number of students who go on to study either A Level PE or BTEC Sport Level 3 at college, as well as some students who follow the subject onto university level. There are also ex pupils in the local area who have jobs in the leisure and sport industry. Further to this it is always a pleasure to see current and ex pupils still leading active any healthy lifestyles outside of the school environment in local gyms, dance companies, swimming pools and competitive sports teams.

Religious Studies
Intent

Religious Studies aims to provoke challenging questions about the ultimate meaning and purpose of life, beliefs about God, the self and nature of reality, issues of right and wrong and what it means to be human. This encourages students to learn from and appreciate the diversity in the world around them and a sense of their own identity and belonging.

Our three-year KS3 curriculum aims to engage students in their learning journey, of both knowledge and understanding of: religion, culture and worldwide issues. We aim to set students up to succeed by making our learning objectives, expectations and the reasoning for them, clear from the start. The intention of our curriculum in the RS department is to ensure that all pupils gain a basic understanding of the principal religions in Great Britain by the time they leave school.

Content

Our aim:
1) To know about and understand a range of religions and worldviews, so that students can:

  • Describe, explain and analyse beliefs and practices, recognising diversity that exists within communities
  • Identify, investigate and respond to questions posed by some of the sources of wisdom found in religions and world views
  • Appreciate and appraise the nature, significance and impact of different ways of life.

2) Express ideas and insights about nature, significance and impact of religions and worldviews, so that students can:

  • Explain reasonably their ideas about how beliefs, practices and forms of expression influence individuals and communities;
  • Express their personal reflections and critical responses to questions and teachings about identity, diversity, meaning and value.
  • Appreciate and appraise varies dimensions of religion

3. Gain and deploy the skills needed to engage seriously with religions and worldviews so students can:

  • Find out about and investigate key concepts and questions of belonging, meaning, purpose and truth, responding creatively;
  • Enquire into what enables different communities to live together respectfully for the wellbeing of all;
  • Articulate beliefs and values clearly in order to explain reasons why they may be important in their own and other people’s lives.

We aim to monitor student’s subject specific vocabulary and to embed literacy and reading into every lesson. We aim to build opportunities for extended writing into our units. We aim that this will enable our students to fully explore ideas and improve literacy skills and subject vocabulary. We aim to build more time into lessons for students to reflect on their learning and their own personal beliefs. We aim to use big questions to build on students’ current knowledge and understanding of world issues and the varying views surrounding them.

Year 7

Term1
Topic 1: Davison Values
Topic 3: The Island

Term 2
Topic 3: What does it mean to be a Sikh?

Term 3
Topic 3: The significance of Jesus for Christians today

Year 8

Term1
Topic 1: The Jewish covenant and the impact that it as today

Term 2
Topic 3: Understanding Christianity

Term 3
Topic 3: What does it mean to be a Muslim

Year 9

Term1
Topic 1: What does it mean to be Buddhist?

Term 2
Topic 2: The Big Story – part I

Term 3
Topic 3: The Big Story – part II
Topic 4: Return to the Island

Year 10

Paper 2: Thematic Studies Paper 2

Term1
Theme A: Relationships and families
Theme B: Religion and Life

Term 2
Theme E: Religion, crime and punishment

Term 3
Theme F: Religion, social justice and human rights
Paper 1: The study of religion
Buddhist beliefs and practices

Year 11

Term1
Buddhist beliefs and practices
Buddhist teachings
Christian beliefs and practices

Term 2
Christian practices
Revision

Term 3
GCSE exam

Implementation

Critical Thinking and Thinking Hard

The RS department centre lessons to provoke challenging questions about meaning and purpose in life, beliefs about God, ultimate reality, issues of right and wrong and what it means to be human.

Throughout KS3 and 4 students are encouraged to consider deep theological and philosophical concepts and questions.

Analysis of key scriptural text

Modelling and Explanation

Student work provided as model answers to analyse.
In KS4 model student answers are used for students to analyse, scrutinise and write their own responses.

Structured Practice of Key Mastery Skills
In KS3 students are provided regular opportunities to practice and revisit different KPIs.
KPI boosts in the Spring and Summer term allow students the opportunity to self-manage the progress of their KPIs.

In KS4 students are given assessment practice within lessons, homework booklets that focus on particular exam questions.

There is a staggered approach to assessments in Year 10 to allow students to master the skills necessary to write exam questions.

Feedback / Feedforward

KS3 units use half termly teacher feedback sheets which allow students to review progress. This in turn informs students on future KPI opportunities.

Exemplar work available on FROG

KS4 end of unit assessments offer opportunities for formative and summative feedback
KS4 students are given mock paper feedback use exemplar answers which have been written by the RS department.

Challenge for Every Student

Lessons are designed so that students across a range of abilities can access the RS curriculum and flourish within lessons. Embedded into lessons are stretch and challenge tasks that offer opportunities for students to go above and beyond with their learning. Lessons and tasks are oftern layered to develop studnts’ understanding KS4 lessons are designed to allow every student to reach their potential. Schemes of Work have work booklet to allow key content to recorded for the more challenging concepts studied.

Independence and Self-regulated learners

ATL 9 opportunities are implemented into lessons to promote independence and challenge
Peer and group work activities provide opportunity for students to self-manage and regulate learning.

Impact

What is the progress and achievement like in your subject? Frog /GCSE results.

How do you monitor their progress and how does intervention work? This does not need to be details analyses of grades just a brief summary.

2019 GCSE Results
9-7
9-4

Science
Intent

At KS3, students will develop a deep understanding of a range of scientific ideas within Biology, Chemistry and Physics through engaging lessons with an emphasis on scientific enquiry. Through an investigative approach to learning, students will learn about the factors to be taken into account when collecting, recording and processing data, how to evaluate their results and identify further questions arising from them. At KS4 students will build on and deepen their knowledge and understanding while further developing their skills by working like real scientists. For some, this will form the basis of further study, post-16, which will establish a basis for a wide range of careers. All students will have a better understanding of the natural world that will enhance their lives in an increasingly technological society. We want all students to feel inspired and challenged by Science and its achievements.

Content

Year 7

Term1

  • Working Scientifically, Speed, Particle Model, Separating Mixtures, Movement,
    Term 2
  • Voltage and Resistance, Current, Metals and Non-metals, Energy Costs, Variation
    Term 3
  • Sound, Earth Structure, Interdependence

Year 8
Term1

  • Gravity, Contact Forces, Periodic Table, Elements, Cells, Magnetism
    Term 2
  • Acids and Alkalis, Human Reproduction, Inheritance, Energy Transfers, Work
    Term 3
  • Light, Universe, Plant Reproduction

Year 9
Term1

  • Pressure, Recap of Y7/8 Chemistry topics, Breathing, Digestion, Electromagnets, Recap of Y7 Electricity topics
    Term 2
  • Chemical Energy, Types of Reaction, Evolution, Heating and Cooling
    Term 3
  • Wave Effects, Wave Properties, GCSE Cell Biology, GCSE Bioenergetics

Year 10
Term1

  • GCSE COMBINED SCIENCE PHYSICS (Energy, Electricity) and GCSE COMBINED SCIENCE CHEMISTRY (Atomic Structure, Bonding) OR GCSE PHYSICS (Energy, Electricity) and GCSE CHEMISTRY (Atomic Structure, Bonding) and GCSE Biology (Cell Biology extension, Organisation)

Term 2

  • GCSE COMBINED SCIENCE PHYSICS (Particle Model, Atomic Structure, Energy Changes) and GCSE COMBINED SCIENCE CHEMISTRY (Quantitative Chemistry, Chemical Changes) OR GCSE PHYSICS (Particle Model, Atomic Structure) and GCSE CHEMISTRY (Quantitative Chemistry, Chemical Changes, Energy Changes) and GCSE Biology (Infection and Response, Bioenergetics extension)

Term 3

  • GCSE COMBINED SCIENCE BIOLOGY (Cell Biology recap, Organisation, Infection and Response, Bioenergetics recap) OR GCSE PHYSICS (Forces) and GCSE CHEMISTRY (Rate and Extent of Chemical Change) and GCSE Biology (Homeostasis and Response)

Year 11
Term1

  • GCSE COMBINED SCIENCE PHYSICS (Forces) and GCSE COMBINED SCIENCE CHEMISTRY (Organic Chemistry, Chemical Analysis) OR GCSE PHYSICS (Waves) and GCSE CHEMISTRY (Organic Chemistry, Chemical Analysis) and GCSE Biology (Homeostasis and Response)

Term 2

  • GCSE COMBINED SCIENCE PHYSICS (Waves, Electricity and Magnetism) and GCSE COMBINED SCIENCE CHEMISTRY (Chemistry of the Atmosphere, Using Resources) and GCSE COMBINED SCIENCE BIOLOGY (Inheritance) OR GCSE PHYSICS (Electricity and Magnetism, Space Physics) and GCSE CHEMISTRY (Chemistry of the Atmosphere, Using Resources) and GCSE Biology (Inheritance, Ecology)

Term 3

  • GCSE COMBINED SCIENCE BIOLOGY (Ecology, Revision of all topics) and GCSE COMBINED SCIENCE PHYSICS (Revision of all topics) and GCSE COMBINED SCIENCE CHEMISTRY (Revision of all topics) OR GCSE PHYSICS (Revision of all topics) and GCSE CHEMISTRY (Revision of all topics) and GCSE Biology (Revision of all topics)
Implementation

At KS3, students follow the AQA KS3 Science Syllabus, this divides the National Curriculum into Physics, Chemistry and Biology topics. Each topic forms part of one of ten “big ideas,” which are first covered in Year 7 and then revisited in both Year 8 and 9, as in the route-through below:

Year 7

Forces *Speed

Matter *Particle Model *Separating mixtures

Organisms *Movement

Electromagnets *Voltage and resistance *Current

Reactions *Metals and non-metals

Genes *Variation

Energy *Energy costs

Waves *Sound

Earth *Earth Structure

Eco-systems *Interdependence

Year 8

Forces *Gravity *Contact Forces

Matter *Periodic Table *Elements

Organisms *Cells

Electromagnets *Magnetism

Reactions *Acids and alkalis

Genes *Human reproduction *Inheritance

Energy *Energy Transfer *Work

Waves *Light

Earth *Universe

Eco-systems *Plant Reproduction

Year 9

Forces *Pressure

Matter *Recap of all topics

Organisms *Breathing *Digestion

Electromagnets *Electromagnets *Recap of Y7 topics

Reactions *Chemical energy *Types of reaction

Genes *Evolution

Energy *Heating and cooling

Waves *Wave Effects *Wave Properties

Earth *Climate *Earth resources

Eco-systems *Respiration *Photosynthesis

KS3 students are taught in 4 or 5 ability groups, depending on student numbers, based on Maths-ability. Most groups have two Science teachers who teach different topics. At the end of each topic, students take a summative test and outcomes are used to inform their KPI statuses on Frog Progression Charts. Our KPIs are same as the AQA “big ideas.” Students have access to support and extension resources for every topic on the Science Frog Department site and the opportunities to do “KPI Boost” activities to improve on topics they have struggled with. At the end of each year of KS3, there is a one-hour Science Exam.

At KS4, “Triple Science” (AQA GCSE Physics, Chemistry and Biology) is an option available to students in the top two sets in each half of Year 9. There are one or two Triple Science classes, depending on the number of students who opt for it, in Year 10 and 11. Triple Science classes have one teacher and five hours of curriculum time per week for each of the three Sciences. All other students take AQA Combined Science Trilogy and are taught in four or five groups based on Science-ability, depending on student-numbers. Most students in the Triple Science and top two Combined Science sets take Higher-Tier examinations and the rest take Foundation, although there are a number of exceptions to both, in response to ongoing assessment information.

Both GCSE Combined and Triple Science include the same Physics, Chemistry and Biology topics below, with the exception of Space Physics, which is only in Triple Science. There is more content in each topic for students taking Triple Science. The GCSE topics build on the “big ideas” that underpin Science at KS3.

Biology
1. Cell biology 2. Organisation 3. Infection and response 4. Bioenergetics 5. Homeostasis and response 6. Inheritance, variation and evolution 7. Ecology

Chemistry
8. Atomic structure and the periodic table 9. Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter 10. Quantitative chemistry 11. Chemical changes 12. Energy changes 13. The rate and extent of chemical change 14. Organic chemistry 15. Chemical analysis 16. Chemistry of the atmosphere 17. Using resources

Physics
18. Energy 19. Electricity 20. Particle model of matter 21. Atomic structure 22. Forces 23. Waves 24. Magnetism and electromagnetism 25. Space Physics

At the end of each topic, students take a test with GCSE past-questions and results/estimated grades are recorded to inform reporting to parents and intervention for students who are underachieving. There is an extensive programme of extra lessons for students who need them.

Impact

At KS3, we endeavour to ensure that all students at least “achieve” the expected level in their KPIs and provide support for those who don’t.

We are proud of our results, which have been consistently good for the last nine years. All students take Combined or Triple Science GCSEs. Last year, 75% of Year 11 students taking Combined Science achieved two grade 4s or better and 22% achieved two grade 7s or better. 100% of year 11 students taking Biology achieved grade 4+ and 50% achieved grade 7+. In Chemistry, these figures were 100%/53% and in Physics they were 93%/53%.

Travel and Tourism
Intent

BTEC Travel and Tourism is a vocational qualification which offers students the opportunity to develop their knowledge and understanding of the industry. The controlled assessments offer students the chance to demonstrate their learning in a real-life context. Students work on assignments in a variety of ways; some they complete on their own, and for others they work as part of a team. The aim of the course is to give students the opportunity to gain skills and knowledge required for further study and employment in the travel and tourism industry.

Content

Year 10

Term1

The UK Travel and Tourism Sector

  • Types of Tourism and Travel
  • Principles and Benefits of Sustainable Tourism
  • UK Economy, Employment, Economic Multiplier Effect
  • Industries e.g. Tour Operators, Travel Agents, Online Travel Services, Transport, Accommodation, Visitor Attractions, Art and Entertainment, Development &
    Promotion
  • Key Organisations and types of organisations
  • Interrelationships
  • Consumer Technology

Term 2

  • UK Travel and Tourism Destinations
  • significant UK travel and tourism destinations and gateways
  • different types of visitors to UK travel and tourism destinations
  • appeal of UK tourism destinationsTerm 3
  • Factors Affecting Worldwide Travel and Tourism
  • climatic conditions affecting travel to worldwide destinations
    – time zones
  • entry/exit requirements affect different destinations
  • health issues affect travel and tourism
  • emergency situations that affect travel and tourism

Year 11

Term1

  • Factors Affecting Worldwide Travel and Tourism
  • Revision – The UK Travel and Tourism Sector

Term 2

  • The Travel and Tourism Customer Experience
  • What is customer service?
  • different organisations in the travel and tourism industry
  • customer types
  • needs of different types of customers
  • responding to customer needs
  • expectations of different types of customer
  • impact of excellent and poor customer service

Term 3

  • The Travel and Tourism Customer Experience
  • Retakes if necessary for the UK Travel and Tourism Sector
Implementation

Critical Thinking and Thinking Hard

  • Encourage independent note-taking, selecting information which is needed for their notes.
  • Students have to plan their controlled assessment tasks e.g. time management, layout, information required.
  • Using maps to plan routes
  • Using a range of information to evaluate the positives and negatives of the travel and tourism industryModelling and Explanation
  • Modelling note-taking to help students understand how to take notes.
  • Model exam answers to show effective work.
  • Modelling how to approach a controlled assessment.Structured Practice of Key Mastery Skills
  • Teach unit 1 in Year 10, which allows time for two mocks in Year 10 and another in Year 11. Revisiting revision for Unit 1 several times.
  • Giving students similar activities in lessons and for homework, in preparation for controlled assessment.
    Feedback / Feedforward
  • Employ a range of verbal / written feedback strategies on exam questions with targeted areas for development.
  • Allow students opportunities to respond to feedback, whether immediately through feedback response time.
  • Using formative verbal feedback in lessons.

Challenge for Every Student

  • Students are encouraged to challenge themselves through independent note-taking.
  • Controlled assessments tasks are set to allow all students to aim high.

Independence and Self-regulated learners

  • Pair and group work helps students understand expectations of the controlled assessment.
  • Give students opportunities for learning independently through group work and presentations, setting work in timed conditions.
  • Students are encouraged to ask appropriate questions and look for key information to allow them to complete tasks.
  • Give students opportunities to experience the travel and tourism industry in real life.
Impact

There is a mock exam in December of Yr10 after studying the exam element of the course. There is a further mock exams in June of Year 10 and November of Year 11. A mark and a level are given for the exam papers and then as a class the students are given verbal feedback and an opportunity to discuss the answers. The data is used to enter onto SIMs for analysis and helps identify students that require additional support. The external BTEC exam is in January of Yr 11. The results are released in March and if students have not achieved the level required, they have an opportunity to re-sit in May/June.

Three units of controlled assessment are completed in KS4. There are eight assignments in total. Each assignment is awarded a level/grade and these are then totalled together to give an overall level/grade. Throughout the course, the completed assignment data is used to forecast student grades and highlight students who require intervention/support.

2019 Data

No. of Students 28

9-7 7.14%

9-4 100.00%

Levels Progress 3.54

Progress 8 0.33

School Average R3  0.37

2018-19 Trend:

2018 86%

2019 100%

KS3 All subjects, kpis & learning lockers